Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Senate's top Democrat is telling President Trump that any infrastructure deal must contain robust moves to bolster zero-carbon energy and build resilience to climate change.

Why it matters: Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer' demand — spelled out in a new Washington Post op-ed — is the latest sign that climate is emerging as a priority for Capitol Hill Democrats, at least for now.

Driving the news: Schumer writes that if Trump wants Democratic support on an infrastructure bill, it must have policies and money that "help transition our country to a clean-energy economy and mitigate the risks the United States already faces from climate change."

Reality check: Infrastructure is perennially floated as an area where there's potential for bipartisan dealmaking. But actually getting a sweeping political deal done is a far tougher thing to imagine happening.

  • That was true even before Schumer's decision to demand provisions aimed at addressing a problem that Trump scarcely acknowledges, and doesn't accept is human-caused despite the overwhelming scientific consensus.
  • Schumer's op-ed also bashes Trump's moves to unwind Obama-era policies.

Threat level: Schumer's op-ed says Democrats have leverage because they'll control the House and Trump will need 60 votes in the Senate — and therefore Democratic help there — to get an infrastructure bill through Congress.

Details: In the op-ed and an open letter to Trump, Schumer calls for provisions including...

  • Permanent tax credits for clean power production, electric vehicles, energy storage, efficient buildings and more.
  • Federal spending on new transmission to help move renewable power, as well as investments in smart grid and microgrid technology.
  • "Substantially" increasing federal spending on research, development and deployment of clean energy.
  • Money to help communities harden their infrastructure against extreme weather and disasters.
  • A new federal loan program to help communities build resilience, including "natural infrastructure solutions" like restored wetlands.

Go deeper: Climate politics moves up the Democrats' priority list

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NYT: White House drug price negotiations broke down over $100 "Trump Cards"

President Trump with Mark Meadows, his chief of staff, on Sept. 3 at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Negotiations on a deal between the White House and pharmaceutical industry to lower drug prices broke down last month after Mark Meadows, the president's chief of staff, insisted that drugmakers pay for $100 cash cards to be mailed to seniors before the election, according to the New York Times.

Why it matters: Some of the drug companies feared that in agreeing to the prescription cards — reportedly dubbed "Trump Cards" by some in the pharmaceutical industry — they would boost Trump's political standing weeks ahead of Election Day with voters over 65, a group that is crucial to the president's reelection bid, per the Times.

In photos: Virginians line up for hours on first day of early voting

Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

In some parts of Virginia, people waited in line up to four hours to cast their ballots on the first day of early voting, according to the Washington Post.

The big picture: The COVID-19 pandemic seems to already have an impact on how people cast their votes this election season. As many as 80 million Americans are expected to vote early, by mail or in person, Tom Bonier, CEO of TargetSmart, a Democratic political data firm, told Axios in August.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 30,306,469 — Total deaths: 948,147— Total recoveries: 20,626,515Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 6,705,114 — Total deaths: 198,197 — Total recoveries: 2,540,334 — Total tests: 92,163,649Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.