Jan 15, 2019

DNC reportedly withdraws Women's March sponsorship

Protesters walk during the Women’s March in January 2017 in Washington, D.C. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Democratic National Committee is the latest in a growing list of institutions to rescind their sponsorship of the national Women’s March, which is facing backlash over claims of anti-Semitism ahead of its annual event on Saturday, The Daily Beast reports.

Why it matters: Women's March co-founder Tamika Mallory appeared on The View Monday and defended her ties to Louis Farrakhan, the controversial leader of the Nation of Islam known for his anti-Semitic rhetoric. Allegations of anti-semitism have clouded this year's march and divided the organization, which in 2017 organized one of the largest protests in U.S. history.

Details: The DNC was listed as one of the "2019 Women’s March Sponsors" as recently as Sunday, per The Daily Beast. But as of Tuesday, it's longer listed on the website.

  • A DNC official declined a request by the publication to comment on the matter, but the committee provided a statement about its decision not to participate in this year's event.
"The DNC stands in solidarity with all those fighting for women's rights and holding the Trump administration and Republican lawmakers across the country accountable. Women are on the front lines of fighting back against this administration and are the core of our Democratic Party."  
— Sabrina Singh, DNC deputy communications director

BuzzFeed News' Ruby Cramer also reported Tuesday that many 2020 Democratic hopefuls are distancing themselves from the Women's March as a result of the controversy.

Go deeper: Accusations of anti-Semitism divide Women's March organizers

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