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Reproduced from the Goldman School of Public Policy; Chart: Axios Visuals

Declining costs for renewables and battery storage could enable a nearly carbon-free U.S. electricity mix by 2035 without raising consumers' power bills, a new report argues.

Why it matters: The report's pathway for deeply decarbonizing the electricity mix is faster than what's envisioned under various state-level and power company targets.

  • The analysis, from a UC Berkeley public policy school and the nonprofit GridLab, also arrives as activists are pushing Joe Biden to adopt more aggressive policies.
  • Standing reminder: Biden's current plan is already a heavy political and technological lift and goes far beyond Obama-era policies.

What they're saying: Amol Phadke, a scientist with Berkeley's Center for Environmental Public Policy, said cost declines have occurred faster than anticipated.

  • “This is the first report to integrate the latest low prices for renewable energy and storage and shows it is technically and economically feasible to deliver 90 percent carbon-free electricity on the U.S. power grid by 2035," Phadke said in a statement alongside the report.

But, but, but: The "90% clean" goal of the report, which envisions no new natural gas plants and a phase-out of coal, rests on a series of substantial federal and state policy changes and incentives proposed in an accompanying memo from the firm Energy Innovation.

Go deeper

Scientific American backs Biden in first endorsement in 175-year history

Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Scientific American backed former Vice President Joe Biden for president on Tuesday — marking the first time the publication has made a presidential endorsement in its 175-year history.

The big picture: The magazine's editors excoriated President Trump's response to the coronavirus pandemic in an op-ed — arguing that he "rejects evidence and science," contributing to the country's death toll of nearly 200,000.

Senate confirms retired Gen. Lloyd Austin as defense secretary

Photo: Greg Nash-Pool/Getty Images

The Senate voted 93-2 on Friday to confirm retired Gen. Lloyd Austin as secretary of defense. Sens. Mike Lee (R-Utah) and Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) were the sole "no" votes.

Why it matters: Austin is the first Black American to lead the Pentagon and President Biden's second Cabinet nominee to be confirmed.

House will transmit article of impeachment to Senate on Monday, Schumer says

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) announced that the House will deliver the article of impeachment against former President Trump for "incitement of insurrection" on Monday.

Why it matters: The Senate is required to begin the impeachment trial at 1pm the day after the article is transmitted.