Scott Sonner / AP

What a difference a day can make. We told you Nevada Sen. Dean Heller should expect a fierce blowback from social conservatives after he defended Planned Parenthood in a rowdy town hall meeting Monday afternoon. Penny Nance, the president of Concerned Women for America, fired the first public warning shot in our article.

Less than 24 hours later, Heller was singing a different tune.

Here's Heller on Monday afternoon:

  1. "I will protect Planned Parenthood."
  2. "I have no problems with federal funding for Planned Parenthood."

Here's Heller on Tuesday, via his spokeswoman Megan Taylor:

"Senator Heller has worked hard to improve women's access to health care and the quality of care they receive. While he doesn't have a problem with many of the health care services Planned Parenthood offers to women, he is opposed to providing federal funding to any organization that performs abortions and is supported by taxpayers' dollars; he has a long record that reflects his position."

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Mike Allen, author of AM
Updated 9 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump's next moves in Supreme Court fight

Photo: Peter Zay/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

President Trump told "Fox & Friends" on Monday that he plans to announce his pick to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court on Friday or Saturday.

The state of play: Axios has heard that Trump's choices to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg are down to two women, both federal appeals court judges. The frontrunners are Amy Coney Barrett of Chicago, the early favorite, and Barbara Lagoa, who is viewed as easier to confirm. The Senate confirmed Lagoa 80-15 last year, so many Democrats have already voted for her.

CDC updates guidance to say coronavirus can be spread through the air

CDC Director Robert Redfield. Photo: Anna Moneymaker/Pool/Getty Images

The CDC updated its guidance on Friday to acknowledge that the coronavirus can be transmitted through the air at distances farther than six feet and through "droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols" like coughs or sneezes.

Why it matters: The update — which was little noticed until a CNN story was published Sunday — comes months after scientists pushed for the agency to acknowledge the disease was transmissible through the air. The CDC previously said that close person-to-person contact was the bigger concern.

Top Mueller prosecutor: "We could have done more"

Former special counsel Robert Mueller. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Andrew Weissmann, one of former special counsel Robert Mueller's top prosecutors, says in his new book, "Where Law Ends: Inside the Mueller Investigation," that the probe "could have done more" to take on President Trump, per The Atlantic.

Why it matters ... Weissmann argues that the investigation's report didn't go far enough in making a determination regarding Trump's potential obstruction of justice: "When there is insufficient proof of a crime, in volume one, we say it. But when there is sufficient proof, with obstruction, we don’t say it. Who is going to be fooled by that? It’s so obvious."