Jan 22, 2019

More private jets than ever are expected at Davos this week

Planes carrying delegates attending the 2016 World Economic Forum in Davos, arrive at an airport in Zurich. Photo: Marina Lystseva/TASS/Getty Images

Many of the world's billionaires will be at the World Economic Forum in Davos, which kicks off Tuesday, and private jet provider Air Charter Service predicts there will be close to 1,500 private jet flights over the week.

By the numbers: That's a 50% increase from the service's 2018 prediction of 1,000 private jet flights. The website noted it ended up totaling more than 1,300 aircraft movements, an 11% increase from 2017 and the highest number on record.

  • Air Charter Service's website also points out: "According to WingX figures the average number of aircraft movements — arrivals and departures ... for the week of the forum ... rises to an average of 218 — an increase of 335%, with the two busiest days ... seeing 251 and 301 movements, respectively."
  • "Top countries involved in terms of arrivals in and departures out of the airports were Germany, France and the U.K. The U.S. came in fourth with 41 arrivals and 51 departures."

Yes, but: The estimates do not include helicopter trips.

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