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Photo: Oliver Berg/picture alliance via Getty Images

No one likes passwords as a standalone tool to authenticate users. Since 2012, many groups have moved to "kill the password," using that phrase specifically. Yet we'll end the year of 2019 as password-dependent as always.

The big picture: The adage goes that there are three ways to authenticate users: asking them for a thing they know (like a password), a thing they have (like a house key) or a thing they are (like a fingerprint scan).

  • "A thing you know" is the only one of these a hacker can guess.

Everyone wants to kill the password. Google wants to kill the password. Microsoft wants to kill the password. The National Cyber Security Alliance wants to kill the password. Yahoo wanted to kill the password in 2015. Cellphone companies tried to kill it in 2014.

"Passwords won’t even be mostly dead anytime soon, because the fatality won’t spread to legacy applications that are too expensive to retrofit," said Wendy Nather, head advisory chief information security officer of Duo Security, a Cisco-owned company that specializes in bolstering login security.

The intrigue: There are other options than passwords for consumer-friendly security.

  • A widely supported passwordless encryption protocol called WebAuthn is the most recent attempt to codify a global standard.
  • Microsoft, and others, offer apps that use cellphones to authenticate.
  • Google and Facebook allow users to login once on their services and log into other sites based on their go-ahead.

But, but, but: Users have a tendency to assume that authentication systems that are easier to use are less secure — that, somehow, the amount of effort it takes the user to do something is indicative of how difficult it would be for a hacker to break in.

  • The Facebook breach shows some of the dangers of using a website with multiple moving parts as a centralized clearinghouse of user authentication.
  • And, in general, for the security savvy consumer, it's always safer to use multifactor authentication — say, a thing you have plus a password or a biometric plus a password.

Editor's note: Wendy Nather is the sister of David Nather, managing editor at Axios.

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Asymptotic Florida students exposed to COVID no longer have to quarantine

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis during a September news conference in Viera, Fla. Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) announced Wednesday an emergency order allowing parents to decide whether their children should quarantine or stay in school if they're exposed to COVID-19, provided they're asymptomatic.

Why it matters: People infected with COVID-19 can spread the coronavirus starting from two days before they display symptoms, according to the CDC. Quarantine helps prevent the virus' spread.

Federal judge: Florida ban on sanctuary cities racially motivated

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A federal judge on Tuesday struck down parts of a Florida law aimed at banning local governments from establishing sanctuary city policies, arguing in part that the law is racially motivated and that it has the support of hate groups.

Why it matters: In a 110-page ruling issued Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Beth Bloom said the law — signed and championed by Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) — violates the Constitution's Equal Protection Clause because it was adopted with discriminatory motives.

Biden steps into the breach

Sen. Joe Manchin heads to a meeting with President Biden today. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

President Biden ramped up the pressure on his fellow Democrats Wednesday, calling a series of lawmakers to the White House in the hope of ending infighting and getting them in line.

Why it matters: Divisions within the party are threatening to derail Biden's top priorities. After several weeks of letting negotiations play out, the president is finally asserting his power to ensure his own party doesn't block his agenda.