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Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Dark Overlord, a cybercriminal collective known for targeting a few flashy, high-profile victims, is hiring. They've even posted a help wanted ad, archived by the threat intelligence firm Digital Shadows — and their job listing is more like "The Office" than "Mr. Robot."

Why it matters: If you imagine hacking and cybercrime as an alternative subculture of punk kids with keyboards, think again: Hacking groups are businesses of a sort, and some of them are borrowing the language and recruiting techniques of the mainstream.

The Dark Overlord's job listing, posted in November, is a window into IT hacking as a daily-grind office job.

  • "Very corporate," said Rick Holland, chief information security officer and vice president of strategy at Digital Shadows. "If you saw that ad pop up on Indeed, you’d think it was an average tech company."

Background: The Dark Overlord is the group that famously threatened to leak "Orange is the New Black" and "Game of Thrones" content if networks didn't pay up. More recently, the group has begun leaking documents from insurance providers related to 9/11.

"Must have a winning attitude." According to the job listing found on the KickAss hacker forum, "If you're goal oriented and used to objectives and achieving them, you're perfect for us."

  • The listing is pure Silicon Valley, sprinkling corporate programming buzzwords and human resources jargon amid tightly organized subheadings.
  • The job listing requires 10 years' experience in software design, network management or systems administration, with 5 years working in a "team-based cooperation environment."
  • Applicants "must be able to bring innovative approaches to the operations and work outside-the-box regularly." They'll need to submit to certification and skills testing. ("We do that too!" notes Holland.)
  • The Dark Overlord offers either a salary or commission payment structure. Save for the higher figures (the job pays a starting salary of as much as 50,000 British pounds a month), the salary option would fit in any office park. There's a 90-day probationary period with the potential for a raise after a year.

The bottom line: View The Dark Overlord as a late-stage tech startup trying to grow its workforce after early buzz wore off and some of the original talent has begun to depart.

  • The TV and 9/11 hacks, including a promotional site for the "Game of Thrones" operation, have kept the group's public profile aloft.
  • But Holland says business has been down for The Dark Overlord. Deposits into the groups cryptocurrency accounts have dwindled.
  • Meanwhile, there has been turnover at the office. Digital Shadows notes that the group allegedly recently lost some of its talent to arrests — a problem less common, though not entirely unheard of, in the more conventional tech industry.

Go deeper: Suspect admits to hacking data of German public officials

Go deeper

46 mins ago - World

In photos: Deadly Cyclone Tauktae leaves trail of destruction across India

A police officer helps a public transport driver cross a flooded street due to heavy rain caused by Tropical Cyclone Tauktae in Mumbai, India, on May 17. Photo: Ashish Vaishnav/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Tropical Cyclone Tauktae killed at least 16 people in India after making landfall in Gujarat Monday, packing 100mph winds, and sweeping across Kerala, Karnataka, Goa and Maharashtra, per Reuters.

The big picture: The storm unleashed heavy rains and winds as authorities continued to grapple with surging infection rates and deaths from COVID-19. Over 200,000 people were evacuated from Gujarat, and ports, airports and vaccination centers shut in the state and Mumbai, Reuters reports. Tauktae weakened from a Category 3 storm into a "severe cyclonic storm" Tuesday morning local time.

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Scoop: Yellen wants business to help foot infrastructure bill

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen is heading into the belly of the beast Tuesday and asking the business community to support President Biden's $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan during a speech to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Why it matters: By trying to persuade a skeptical and targeted audience, Yellen is signaling the president’s commitment to raising corporate taxes to pay for his plan. Republican senators, critical to a potential bipartisan deal, oppose any corporate tax increase.

4 hours ago - World

Schumer's Israel vise

Sen. Chuck Schumer addresses the American Israel Public Affairs Committee in March 2014. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's longtime support for Israel puts him on a collision course with the progressive wing of his party as the conflict between Israel and Hamas worsens.

Why it matters: This is the toughest political position the New York Democrat has been in since becoming majority leader. The fighting in the Middle East is dividing his party — and creating a clear rift among its different wings.