Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!
Data: Descartes Labs Economic Activities Signal; Chart: Sara Wise/Axios

Americans in most states are moving at nearly the same level as, and sometimes even more than, before the pandemic compelled lockdowns across the U.S.

Driving the news: Mobility data from Descartes Labs shows the vast swing in American movement over the last four months, with this chart showing March 7-July 4.

Why it matters: Tracking mobility habits sheds light on many aspects of our society, including economic indicators like gasoline demand and levels of local pollution.

By the numbers: Gas prices averaged $2.18 a gallon, the cheapest for Independence Day weekend in at least a decade, according to a research note published Tuesday by investment bank RBC Capital Markets.

The intrigue: We spotted some interesting trends:

  • People in largely rural, western states — including Montana, the Dakotas and Wyoming — are actually moving around more than they did right before lockdowns, data shows. (That's to be expected in the summer months, but given the coronavirus, it also shows the relative increase compared to other states.)
  • Mobility in southern states and some in the west didn’t drop nearly as much as their coastal counterparts, reflecting a political trend with more liberal states locking down more aggressively and earlier than more conservative ones.

How it works: Descartes Labs, a data sciences firm based in Sante Fe, New Mexico, uses what it calls “de-identified commercially available geolocation data” to develop its mobility index, which is what we’ve charted here.

  • The firm receives data from commercial data partners regarding mobile phone applications that maintain appropriate consents, approvals and/or opt-ins. It declined to specify which kinds of applications it receives.

Yes, but: As the virus increases its spread in numerous states and governors consider partially locking down for a second time, mobility could tick back down again.

What we’re watching: RBC Capital Markets said its real-time indicators “suggest a slowing degree of traffic activity this past weekend” due to the coronavirus spreading more aggressively in some states.

Go deeper

Trump blames "blue states" for high coronavirus cases in U.S.

President Trump said in a press conference Wednesday that the U.S. coronavirus death toll is "very low ... if you take the blue states out," while defending the nation's response to the pandemic compared to other countries around the world.

Why it matters: Of the top five states with the largest death tolls from the virus, three have Democratic governors, suggesting there is little relation between the spread of the virus and the political parties of state leaders.

51 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Stalemate over filibuster freezes Congress

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Mitch McConnell's inability to quickly strike a deal on a power-sharing agreement in the new 50-50 Congress is slowing down everything from the confirmation of President Biden's nominees to Donald Trump's impeachment trial.

Why it matters: Whatever final stance Schumer takes on the stalemate, which largely comes down to Democrats wanting to use the legislative filibuster as leverage over Republicans, will be a signal of the level of hardball we should expect Democrats to play with Republicans in the new Senate.

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Biden opts for five-year extension of New START nuclear treaty with Russia

Putin at a military parade. Photo: Valya Egorshin/NurPhoto via Getty

President Biden will seek a five-year extension of the New START nuclear arms control pact with Russia before it expires on Feb. 5, senior officials told the Washington Post.

Why it matters: The 2010 treaty is the last remaining constraint on the arsenals of the world's two nuclear superpowers, limiting the number of deployed nuclear warheads and the bombers, missiles and submarines which can deliver them.