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Expand chart
Data: Staff research; Chart: Axios Visuals

Economists are cutting expectations for first quarter GDP to reflect the government shutdown's hit to the economy, but not all of the growth lost during the shutdown is forever gone.

What they're saying: Barclays economist Michael Gapen cited the shutdown's "effects on consumer spending and other expenditure categories over and above the direct effect in terms of the drop in production by furloughed government workers."

The big picture: The CBO estimates the shutdown cost the economy $11 billion, including $3 billion of activity that won't be recovered.

  • "Some businesses could not obtain federal permits and certifications, and others faced reduced access to loans provided by the federal government. Such factors were probably beginning to lead firms to postpone investment and hiring decisions," CBO officials wrote in their report.
  • Unsurprisingly, the White House disagrees that the shutdown's economic impact was this severe.

What's going on: Three of the big banks raised estimates for second quarter growth, alongside their first quarter downgrades, saying that the lost economic activity will resurface in the second quarter.

  • There will be a rebound in economic activity in the second quarter once federal employees — many of whom couldn’t work for 35 days, and missed two weeks of pay — work for an uninterrupted quarter, Morgan Stanley economist Ellen Zentner wrote in a note.

Yes, but: Ethan Harris, an economist at Bank of America, who also upped his second quarter growth forecast says "only some of the lost private sector spending will come back."

  • The White House says backpay for federal workers is expected by the end of the week, but not all contractors can recoup wages.

Watch this space: S&P points out that lost productivity from furloughed employees won’t be recovered and business confidence will slump, especially if it appears that we’re headed for another government shutdown in three weeks.

Our thought bubble, from Axios' Dion Rabouin: It's important to note that the length of this shutdown is unprecedented. The 35-day shutdown was two weeks longer than the previous record in 1995-96 and more than twice as long as the 16-day shutdown in 2013.

Go deeper: Treasury will again borrow $1 trillion to pay for tax cuts, spending

Go deeper

Broncos and 49ers the latest NFL teams impacted by coronavirus crisis

From left, Denver Broncos quarterbacks Drew Lock, Brett Rypien and Jeff Driskel during an August training session at UCHealth Training Center in Englewood, Colorado. Photo: Justin Edmonds/Getty Images

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the NFL season into chaos, with all Denver Broncos quarterbacks sidelined, the San Francisco 49ers left without a home or practice ground and much of the Baltimore Ravens team unavailable, per AP.

Driving the news: The Broncos confirmed in a statement Saturday night that quarterbacks Drew Lock, Brett Rypien and Blake Bortles were identified as "high-risk COVID-19 close contacts" and will follow the NFL's mandatory five-day quarantine, making them ineligible for Sunday's game against New Orleans.

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release."
  2. Politics: McConnell temporarily halts in-person lunches for GOP caucus.
  3. Economy: Safety nets to disappear in DecemberAmazon hires 1,400 workers a day throughout pandemic.
  4. Education: U.S. public school enrollment drops as pandemic persists.
  5. Cities: Surge in cases forces San Francisco to impose curfew — Los Angeles County issues stay-at-home order, limits gatherings.
  6. Sports: NFL bans in-person team activities Monday, Tuesday due to COVID-19 surge — NBA announces new coronavirus protocols.
  7. World: London police arrest more than 150 during anti-lockdown protests — Thailand, Philippines sign deal with AstraZeneca for vaccine.

Tony Hsieh, longtime Zappos CEO, dies at 46

Tony Hsieh. Photo: FilmMagic/FilmMagic

Tony Hsieh, the longtime ex-chief executive of Zappos, died on Friday after being injured in a house fire, his lawyer told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. He was 46.

The big picture: Hsieh was known for his unique approach to management, and following the 2008 recession his ongoing investment and efforts to revitalize the downtown Las Vegas area.