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Independent National Electoral Commission agents count votes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Photo: Caroline ThirionAFP/Getty Images

Government officials in the Democratic Republic of the Congo chose to delay announcing the results of last month's presidential election on Sunday, prompting fears that the vote count could be manipulated in favor of the ruling party, AP reports.

Why it matters: The Congo has never had a peaceful transition of power since its independence in 1960, but its citizens went to the polls on Dec. 30 after years of delay and an apparent last-minute arson attack that destroyed most of the voting machines in Kinshasa, the country's capital. The Congolese government did not announce a new date for the results and has cut Internet access across the country to prevent social media speculation about the election's winner, despite the fact that the Catholic Church, a strong presence in the country, has stated there is a clear winner based on its election observers.

Go deeper: Fury and fear ahead of Congo's suspect elections

Go deeper

48 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Minority Mitch still setting Senate agenda

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Chuck Schumer may be majority leader, yet in many ways, Mitch McConnell is still running the Senate show — and his counterpart is about done with it.

Why it matters: McConnell rolled over Democrats unapologetically, and kept tight control over his fellow Republicans, while in the majority. But he's showing equal skill as minority leader, using political jiujitsu to convert a perceived weakness into strength.

Schumer rattles reconciliation saber

More than an aisle separates Mitch McConnell and Chuck Schumer, seen in the Senate Chamber after the Capitol siege. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Chuck Schumer is expected to telegraph, as soon as tonight, that he will use his political muscle to pass some of his party’s priorities — like President Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus package.

Why it matters: While the Senate majority leader wants to work with Republicans on key legislation, advisers say, he will make clear that using the simple majority vote inherent in the budget reconciliation process is one of the big sticks at his disposal.