Nov 20, 2019

112-year-old Confederate statue in N.C. is removed

Confederate flag. Photo: Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

A statue in Pittsboro, North Carolina, of a Confederate soldier was removed this week from where it stood in front of the city's courthouse for 112 years, Raleigh's News & Observer reports.

Why it matters: The private monument, owned by the United Daughters of Confederacy, caused a contentious divide over the past few years between those who protested its existence and those who wanted it left alone.

"The last several months have been a painful time for Chatham County. We've experienced high emotions, division and even violence which have impacted residents, businesses and the overall feel of our community."
— Mike Dasher, chairman of the Chatham County Board of Commissioners, in a press release

The big picture: Many Confederate statues have been taken down nationwide.

  • Crews worked to "safely and respectfully dismantle" the statue in Pittsboro, which will be in the Winnie Davis Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy's possession until further decisions are made on where to put it.
  • Chatham County has a lengthy history of racism and violence, including the lynchings of at least six black people in the 19th and early 20th centuries, per the Chatham News and Record.

Yes, but: 65% of North Carolina residents say Confederate monuments should remain, according to a statewide survey from Elon University released on Wednesday.

Go deeper: Dozens of Confederate statues have been removed since the last "Unite the Right" rally

Go deeper

Protests for George Floyd continue for 10th day

Thousands of protesters march over the Brooklyn Bridge on June 4 in New York City. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

All four former Minneapolis police officers have been charged for George Floyd’s death and are in custody, including Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao, who were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

The latest: Crowds gathered in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on Thursday evening and in Atlanta, Georgia, despite the rain. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms joined demonstrators on Thursday. Demonstrators in Washington, D.C. dispersed following a thunderstorm and rain warning for the region.

Trump says he will campaign against Lisa Murkowski after her support for Mattis

Trump with Barr and Meadows outside St. John's Episcopal church in Washington, D.C. on June 1. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Thursday that he would endorse "any candidate" with a pulse who runs against Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

Driving the news: Murkowski said on Thursday that she supported former defense secretary James Mattis' condemnation of Trump over his response to protests in the wake of George Floyd's killing. She described Mattis' statement as "true, honest, necessary and overdue," Politico's Andrew Desiderio reports.

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Trump visits Mattis and the Pentagon in 2018. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty

Over the course of just a few hours, President Trump was rebuffed by the Secretary of Defense over his call for troops in the streets and accused by James Mattis, his former Pentagon chief, of trampling the Constitution for political gain.

Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.