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Reproduced from IEA; Chart: Axios Visuals

The International Energy Agency is out with a preview of next week's report on the state of coal and the future of the resource over the next five years.

What they found: One conclusion is that Asia will largely dictate the future of how quickly the world does — or doesn't — begin moving away from the most carbon-emitting fuel.

The big picture: Coal use is falling fast in the U.S. and the EU, but it's rising in Asia, which, as the chart above shows, now dominates coal-based electricity.

"As Asia’s share continues to rise, the rest of the world is becoming increasingly irrelevant in the conversation about coal power generation, which is one of the key sources of global CO2 emissions."
— Carlos Fernandez Alvarez, IEA analyst

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