Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

An internal, 3-year State Department investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's private emails has found 38 people culpable, and those still at the department could be disciplined with letters in their files, the AP reports.

The bottom line: The 38 current or former State employees were not named in a letter to Congress outlining the findings. The investigation found they sent classified information that ended up in Clinton's private inbox, according to the AP. The investigation covered more than 33,000 emails, but found no one liable in 497 of the 588 violations it found.

Why it matters: Now-President Trump made the emails and server a major focus of his presidential campaign when he ran against Clinton in 2016 and still raises the issue in his re-election campaign. Then-FBI Director James Comey that year criticized Clinton's "extremely careless" use of a private email server, but the FBI recommended no charges. The Justice Department inspector general in 2016 found no evidence that Clinton's private server had been hacked.

Go Deeper: Comey gets contentious with House Republicans in closed door session

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Updated 31 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 19,172,505 — Total deaths: 716,327— Total recoveries — 11,608,417Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 4,902,692 — Total deaths: 160,394 — Total recoveries: 1,598,624 — Total tests: 59,652,675Map.
  3. Politics: Trump floats executive action even if stimulus deal is reached.
  4. Education: Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning.
  5. Public health: Surgeon general urges flu shots to prevent "double whammy" with coronavirus.
  6. World: Africa records over 1 million coronavirus cases.

General Motors tries to revive incendiary lawsuit vs. Fiat Chrysler

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

General Motors is trying to revive an incendiary lawsuit against Fiat Chrysler Automobiles with explosive new allegations including bribes paid from secret offshore bank accounts and a union official acting as a double agent between the two automotive giants.

Why it matters: The extraordinary legal battle is occurring amid earth-shaking changes in the global auto industry that threaten to turn both litigants into dinosaurs if they aren't nimble enough to pivot to a future where transportation is a service, cars run on electrons and a robot handles the driving.

3 hours ago - Health

Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning

Gov. Cuomo on July 23 in New York City. Photo: Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday that all school districts across the state can choose to reopen for in-person learning because it has so far maintained low enough coronavirus transmission rates.

Why it matters: It’s another sign that the state, once the global epicenter of the pandemic, has — at least for now — successfully curbed the spread of the virus even as infections have surged elsewhere around the country.