Dec 26, 2019

The Atlantic Ocean and states in the Northeast are warming dramatically

Storm clouds on the skyline of Manhattan in New York City before a powerful storm brought nasty wind gusts Photo: Kena Betancur/VIEWpress

States in the Northeast are warming more over the long and short-term than other U.S. regions, according to a USA Today analysis of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data.

Why it matters: The changes have manifested in the unusual appearance of warm-water fish off the New England coast, the warming of the Great Lakes, and higher ocean temperatures, which influence coastal weather and push snowfall farther inland.

By the numbers: Long-term data shows Rhode Island's average temperature increased by 3.64 degrees from its average in the 20th century, according to NOAA data going back to 1895.

  • New Jersey is 3.49 degrees warmer, while Connecticut is up by 3.22 degrees; Maine, 3.17; Massachusetts, 3.05; and New Hampshire, 2.93.
  • In the short term, Delaware and New Jersey tied for the largest increase in temperature at 3 degrees. Rhode Island, Connecticut, Arizona, California and Florida all followed.

The bottom line: The Atlantic Ocean is warming dramatically, scientists concluded, possibly as a result of climate change.

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The 2010s were officially the hottest decade on record

Residents defend a property from a bushfire at Hillsville near Taree, north of Sydney in Australia on Nov. 12. Photo: Peter Parks/AFP via Getty Images

It's official: Last year was the world's second hottest on record, and 2010-2019 was the hottest decade ever recorded.

Why it matters: The findings, published in two separate reports by NOAA and the British weather service the Met Office Wednesday, are in line with those of research group Berkeley Earth, revealed at the start of the year. It's yet more evidence of the long-term warming trend that stems from human-induced greenhouse gas emissions.

Study: Climate change effects apparent in daily global weather data

Concrete blocks are placed along the shoreline to try and prevent further coastal erosion, on December 2019 in Mahibadhoo, Maldives.

The imprint of climate change is now apparent in global weather data at a daily level, according to a new paper in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Climate Change.

Why it matters: "If verified by subsequent work, the findings ... would upend the long-established narrative that daily weather is distinct from long-term climate change," the Washington Post reports.

Go deeperArrowJan 3, 2020

Hottest decade on record

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

2019 wasn't just the second-hottest year on record — the 2010s will go down as the hottest decade in human memory, per a new report.

Driving the news: The Copernicus Climate Change Service found "an unrelenting upward trend in temperatures as emissions of greenhouse gases trap heat in the atmosphere and change the climate," the N.Y. Times notes.

Go deeperArrowJan 8, 2020