Reproduced from Pew Research Center; Chart: Axios Visuals

Roughly two-thirds (65%) of adults say the federal government is doing too little to curb the effects of climate change, according to Pew Research polling.

Why it matters: Overall, the poll finds both persistently deep partisan divides on climate and energy, but also some areas of agreement on policy.

The big picture: There are some areas of overlap between Democrats and Republicans on policy, which could become more relevant after the 2020 election.

  • But like many other polls, it also shows deep divides.

By the numbers: 89% of adults who are Democrats (or lean that way) say the government is doing too little on climate, compared to 35% of Republicans or Republican-leaners.

  • 79% of adults say energy policy should emphasize the development of "alternative" sources like wind and solar, including 45% of Republicans and nearly all Democrats.
  • Overall, 56% of Republicans favor more fracking, compared to 21% of Democrats. The poll shows a drop in Republican support for more coal mining, but it's still at 54%, compared to 16% among Democrats.
  • "About seven-in-ten Democrats (72%) say human activity contributes a great deal to climate change, compared with roughly two-in-ten Republicans (22%), a difference of 50 percentage points," it states.
  • A quick reminder: The scientific consensus is that human activity is the overwhelming driver of global warming since the mid-20th century.

Of note: The overall survey of nearly 11,000 U.S. adults conducted between April 9 and May 5 has a margin of error of ± 1.4%.

  • It's higher for responses broken down by party, age, race, gender and education, and you can find those margins here.

Go deeper

Updated Sep 17, 2020 - Axios Events

Watch: The economics of renewable energy

On Thursday, September 17, Axios' Amy Harder hosted a conversation on the growth of clean energy and sustainability, featuring Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and Amazon's Head of Worldwide Sustainability Kara Hurst.

Gov. Inslee discussed efforts within Washington to address climate change, its impact on fires in Washington state and the role of renewable energy in the state.

  • On the role of climate change in recent fires: "These fires are incredibly cataclysmic. The solution to this, of course...[is that] we need to reduce this climate change. It is the ultimately cataclysmic situation we face in Washington."
  • On President Trump's attitude to renewable energy: "He has tried to throw up a roadblock against any development of renewables industries. He's got an allergy to good ideas and infatuation with deception. He's downplayed climate change, just like he downplayed COVID."

Kara Hurst unpacked Amazon's aims to hit carbon neutrality in 2040 and its efforts to help companies develop climate-friendly technologies through a $2 billion venture fund.

  • On partnering with oil and gas producers to achieve climate change goals: "Amazon, like every other company you just mentioned — Google, Microsoft, many tech companies — works across a wide variety of industries. And I believe it's absolutely necessary to work with those types of industries to create transformation."
  • On recent research at Amazon on the sustainability of online shopping: "Online grocery deliveries can generate 43% lower carbon emissions per item as compared to shopping in stores."

Axios co-founder and CEO Jim VandeHei hosted a View from the Top segment with Vinson & Elkins Head of Renewables Practice Group Kaam Sahely, who discussed the surge in demand for renewable energy and the growth of the sector.

  • "The demand [for renewable energy] is almost insatiable. It's not that it's completely without regards to government regulation...The demand for renewable energy continues to rise."

Thank you Vinson & Elkins for sponsoring this event.

Cook Political Report moves Arizona from “toss up” to “lean Democrat” in presidential race

Photos: Sean Rayford/Getty Images; Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Cook Political Report on Thursday changed its forecast of Arizona in the presidential race from "toss up" to "lean Democrat," citing new polling data that shows the Sun Belt state slipping away from President Trump.

Why it matters: The rating in a crucial swing state doesn't bode well for President Trump's re-election chances. He won the state by more than 3 points in 2016.

Hundreds gather to pay tribute to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg along Supreme Court steps

Photo: Alex Brandon/AP

At the Supreme Court steps Friday night hundreds of people gathered to pay tribute to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — singing in a candlelight vigil, with some in tears.

Details: If there is a singular mood at the Supreme Court tonight, it’s some kind of a daze manifested by silence.