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Reproduced from Pew Research Center; Chart: Axios Visuals

Roughly two-thirds (65%) of adults say the federal government is doing too little to curb the effects of climate change, according to Pew Research polling.

Why it matters: Overall, the poll finds both persistently deep partisan divides on climate and energy, but also some areas of agreement on policy.

The big picture: There are some areas of overlap between Democrats and Republicans on policy, which could become more relevant after the 2020 election.

  • But like many other polls, it also shows deep divides.

By the numbers: 89% of adults who are Democrats (or lean that way) say the government is doing too little on climate, compared to 35% of Republicans or Republican-leaners.

  • 79% of adults say energy policy should emphasize the development of "alternative" sources like wind and solar, including 45% of Republicans and nearly all Democrats.
  • Overall, 56% of Republicans favor more fracking, compared to 21% of Democrats. The poll shows a drop in Republican support for more coal mining, but it's still at 54%, compared to 16% among Democrats.
  • "About seven-in-ten Democrats (72%) say human activity contributes a great deal to climate change, compared with roughly two-in-ten Republicans (22%), a difference of 50 percentage points," it states.
  • A quick reminder: The scientific consensus is that human activity is the overwhelming driver of global warming since the mid-20th century.

Of note: The overall survey of nearly 11,000 U.S. adults conducted between April 9 and May 5 has a margin of error of ± 1.4%.

  • It's higher for responses broken down by party, age, race, gender and education, and you can find those margins here.

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Oct 1, 2020 - Energy & Environment

Pollution from California's wildfires cuts solar power generation

Screenshot from EIA's report on wildfires and solar generation

From the apocalypse files: A new Energy Information Administration analysis shows that pollution from California's dreadful wildfires has substantially curtailed solar power generation in the state.

Why it matters: Everything's connected. The growing wildfires in California — a problem worsened in part by global warming — create complications for one of the power sources that can help fight climate change.

10 hours ago - World

Maximum pressure campaign escalates with Fakhrizadeh killing

Photo: Fars News Agency via AP

The assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, the architect of Iran’s military nuclear program, is a new height in the maximum pressure campaign led by the Trump administration and the Netanyahu government against Iran.

Why it matters: It exceeds the capture of the Iranian nuclear archives by the Mossad, and the sabotage in the advanced centrifuge facility in Natanz.

Scoop: Biden weighs retired General Lloyd Austin for Pentagon chief

Lloyd Austin testifying before Congress in 2015. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Joe Biden is considering retired four-star General Lloyd Austin as his nominee for defense secretary, adding him to a shortlist that includes Jeh Johnson, Tammy Duckworth and Michele Flournoy, two sources with direct knowledge of the decision-making tell Axios.

Why it matters: A nominee for Pentagon chief was noticeably absent when the president-elect rolled out his national security team Tuesday. Flournoy had been widely seen as the likely pick, but Axios is told other factors — race, experience, Biden's comfort level — have come into play.