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Expand chart
Reproduced from IEA; Chart: Axios Visuals

The effects of climate change can create new hurdles to the fight against climate change.

What's happening: New International Energy Agency reports on southeast Asia have eye-popping numbers on the rise of air conditioning use. This reflects IEA’s “stated policies” scenario that assumes existing policies and plans, as well as evolution of “known technologies.”

  • It's largely due to higher incomes and economic growth as more people, thankfully, have access to cooling that's taken for granted in rich countries.
  • However, IEA notes that "rising temperatures will also play a part in these growth rates" and more heat and humidity also mean more frequent use.

Why it matters: It adds to soaring energy demand in the region. And while renewables are growing, IEA sees growth in use of all fossil fuels — including coal — through 2040 too.

  • What's next: The IEA reports offer recommendations for boosting the efficiency of cooling and more broadly speeding up renewables deployment.

And the hotter and drier conditions climate change brings are among the slew of forces that are increasing the risks of devastating fires in California and elsewhere.

  • A deeply reported L.A. Times piece this week explores how those fires could frustrate emissions-cutting efforts in California, the world's fifth largest economy.
  • The Times' Sammy Roth writes: "[California's] plans for slashing climate emissions depend on a stable electric grid delivering clean electricity to the cars, homes and businesses of the world’s fifth-largest economy."
  • "The jarring new reality of preemptive blackouts could frustrate those plans by throwing the grid’s reliability into doubt."

The state of play: Those are just two instances of a wider challenge.

  • For instance, consider how global warming's various effects, such as its contribution to migration, can create problems that compete for attention with emissions-cutting efforts.
  • Limited budgets could mean tradeoffs between building resilience and reducing emissions to reduce future harm.

Go deeper: How your air conditioner plays catch-up to regulations

Go deeper

Updated 5 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.

1 hour ago - Health

CDC extends interval between COVID vaccine doses for exceptional cases

Photo: Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty

Patients can space out the two doses of the coronavirus vaccine by up to six weeks if it’s "not feasible" to follow the shorter recommended window, according to updated guidance from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention.

Driving the news: With the prospect of vaccine shortages and a low likelihood that supply will expand before April, the latest changes could provide a path to vaccinate more Americans — a top priority for President Biden.