Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Next year's G7 summit is shaping up to be unusual — not only because the White House will host it at the Trump National Doral Miami resort, but also because acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney told reporters Thursday that "climate change will not be on the agenda" at the June meeting.

Why it matters: Climate's absence from the discussions will mark a sharp break with G7 meetings dating back a decade, according to veterans of global climate diplomacy. It will occur in a state that's grappling with sea-level rise and threatened by Atlantic hurricanes that global warming is making more powerful.

The big picture: The decision underscores the White House reversal of Obama-era norms and policies — something most evident in Trump's intention to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement.

  • Most recently, Trump skipped the climate session at this August's G7 in France.

What they're saying: "The interesting question is how much other countries might push back against the U.S. for doing this," said Andrew Light, a senior climate aide in Obama's State Department, in an email exchange.

The intrigue: Light says the reaction of other countries will be especially important because he expects the administration will initiate the formal withdrawal from Paris as early as Nov. 4.

  • That's the first day, under the Paris agreement's structure, that the U.S. can begin the 1-year exit process, said Light, who is now with the nonprofit World Resources Institute.
  • "If I were advising another G7 leader, I would be worried about how their complicity with an agenda without climate might be interpreted in their home countries when public frustration with climate inaction is at an all-time high," he said.

Go deeper: G7 highlights Trump's climate isolation

Go deeper

Updated 26 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 31,778,331 — Total deaths: 974,436 — Total recoveries: 21,876,025Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 6,943,078 — Total deaths: 201,930 — Total recoveries: 2,670,256 — Total tests: 97,459,742Map.
  3. Health: CDC director says over 90% of Americans have not yet been exposed to coronavirus — Supply shortages continue to plague testing.
  4. Politics: Missouri Gov. Mike Parson tests positive for coronavirus — Poll says 51% of Republicans trust Trump on coronavirus more than the CDC.
  5. Technology: The tech solutions of 2020 may be sapping our resolve to beat the coronavirus
  6. Vaccines: Johnson & Johnson begins large phase 3 trial — The FDA plans to toughen standards.
  7. Sports: Less travel is causing the NBA to see better basketball.
  8. Future: America's halfway coronavirus response

Biden: Breonna Taylor indictment "does not answer" call for justice

Former Vice President Joe Biden. Photo: Leigh Vogel/Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden on Wednesday condemned the grand jury indictment of a Louisville police officer who entered Breonna Taylor's home in March in a botched drug raid that led to her death, saying in a statement the decision "does not answer" for equal justice.

The big picture: Biden called for reforms to address police use of force and no-knock warrants, while demanding a ban on chokeholds. He added that people "have a right to peacefully protest, but violence is never acceptable."

Trump refuses to commit to peaceful transfer of power if he loses

President Trump repeatedly refused to say on Wednesday whether he would commit to a peaceful transition of power if he loses the election to Joe Biden, saying at a press briefing: "We're going to have to see what happens."

The big picture: Trump has baselessly claimed on a number of occasions that the only way he will lose the election is if it's "rigged," claiming — without evidence — that mail-in ballots will result in widespread fraud. Earlier on Wednesday, the president said he wants to quickly confirm a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg because he believes the Supreme Court may have to decide the result of the election.

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