Ex-Rep. Chris Collins ahead of a sentencing hearing on Jan. 17 in New York City. Photo: Scott Heins/Getty Images

Former Rep. Chris Collins (R-N.Y.) was sentenced on Friday to just over two years in prison for making false statements to the FBI and conspiracy to commit securities fraud, the Washington Post reports.

Flashback: Federal prosecutors recommended this week that Collins receive up to 57 months in prison for pleading guilty to insider trading last year. Collins, the first congressman to endorse President Trump in 2016, resigned in September.

Background: Collins was arrested in connection with an alleged insider trading scheme in August 2018 involving Innate Immunotherapeutics, an Australian drug company whose board he sat on for years.

  • Prosecutors alleged that Collins received a tip about about a failed clinical trial involving the company's only product. He then allegedly called his son Cameron, who sold off shares of Innate stock the next day.

Go deeper: Prosecutors recommend almost 5 years in prison for former GOP Rep. Chris Collins

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Updated 5 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 32,919,487 — Total deaths: 995,352 — Total recoveries: 22,770,166Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 7,089,611 — Total deaths: 204,566 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

Biden on Supreme Court fight: "This is about whether or not the ACA will exist"

Joe Biden made health care the overwhelming focus of his remarks from Wilmington, Delaware, on Sunday, stressing that the Senate confirmation battle over Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court is about preserving the Affordable Care Act in the midst of a pandemic.

Why it matters: Democrats are aggressively pushing the message that Barrett, who has previously criticized Chief Justice John Roberts for his 2012 ruling salvaging the ACA, will seek to invalidate the law when the Supreme Court hears a Trump administration-backed lawsuit against it on Nov. 10.

McMaster: Trump's peaceful transition comments are a "gift to our adversaries"

President Trump's refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses November's presidential election is a "gift to our adversaries," Trump's former national security adviser H.R. McMaster said Sunday.

The big picture: McMaster, a retired three-star general, said that the American people must understand that the military will have "no role" in a presidential transition and that it's "irresponsible" to even talk about it as a possibility.