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A protest against police in Chicago. Photo: Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

State and local officials from Illinois and Chicago released a plan on Friday for a far-reaching police department reform under federal court supervision, reports NBC News.

The big picture: The plan's announcement comes more than a year after an investigation by the Justice Department revealed that the Chicago Police Department had a deep-rooted history of civil rights violations. The report found that the department uses force nearly 10 times as often against black citizens than they did white citizens.

The details: Among the requirements, officers must issue a verbal warning before using force as well as provide life-saving aid after force is used. The plan also issues a 180-day deadline for investigations by the police department's internal affairs bureau and the Civilian Office of Police Accountability.

  • An investigation from the Obama administration's Justice Department that began after the 2014 shooting of Laquan McDonald prompted many of the proposed reforms.

The backdrop: Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan sued Chicago last year seeking court oversight of Chicago's police department, reports NBC.

  • The lawsuit requested an independent court-appointed monitor who would regularly report to a judge about whether the city is meeting reform benchmarks.

What to watch: Though the plan has been released to the public, it is not a done deal. A judge will hold hearings and gather opinions of stakeholders involved before approving the final consent decree.

Police union president Kevin Graham blasted the reform plan calling it "illegal and invalid."

  • He argues it is politically motivated by "anti-police" organizations, naming the American Civil Liberties Union and Black Lives Matter directly while vowing to fight it in court.

Go deeper

Wall Street wonders how bad it has to get

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Wall Street is working out how bad the economy will have to get for Congress to feel motivated to move on economic support.

Why it matters: A pre-Thanksgiving data dump showed more evidence of a floundering economic recovery. But the slow drip of crumbling economic data may not be enough to push Washington past a gridlock to halt the economic backslide.

2 hours ago - Health

Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

Photo illustration by STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Moderna announced that it plans to file with the FDA Monday for an emergency use authorization for its coronavirus vaccine, which the company said has an efficacy rate of 94.1%.

Why it matters: Moderna will become the second company to file for a vaccine EUA after Pfizer did the same earlier this month, potentially paving the way for the U.S. to have two COVID-19 vaccines in distribution by the end of the year. The company said its vaccine has a 100% efficacy rate against severe COVID cases.

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.