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Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Two companies with different climate technologies — trapping emissions from industrial plants and removing CO2 already in the atmosphere — are teaming up.

Driving the news: The Canadian firm Svante and the Swiss company Climeworks AG have a new "joint development agreement" to pilot the combination of the former's industrial capture system alongside Climeworks direct air capture (DAC) tech.

Why it matters: As this recent post from Norway's Center for International Climate and Environmental Research points out, almost all modeled emissions scenarios consistent with meeting the Paris agreement goals envision some level of carbon capturing and negative emissions technologies.

The big picture: "By working together, the two companies can accelerate the development and adoption of both technologies for customers across industries and applications," yesterday's announcement states.

  • Per Bloomberg, Climeworks' goal is to "cut costs for capturing CO2 from ambient air to about $100 a ton from around $600 now."
  • One potential benefit, they said, is that waste heat from Svante's industrial capture process, which is designed for industries like cement and steel, can be used to power Climeworks' DAC machines.

Where it stands: The DAC industry is in pretty early stages and only occurs at a very small scale. Climeworks opened a plant in Switzerland in 2017.

  • Bloomberg notes that Svante "has a plant online that captures 30 tons of CO2 a day at a Husky Energy Inc. facility in Saskatchewan."
  • They're also working with cement giant LafargeHolcim, Total, and Occidental Petroleum to explore a potential project at a cement plant in Colorado.

What they're saying: Noah Deich, executive director of the group Carbon180, tells me there's a logic behind the pairing and called the effort "pretty novel."

  • "Atmospheric and point source capture are both essential for meeting climate goals, and there are a lot of ways that atmospheric and point-source projects can share costs (permitting, infrastructure, financing, etc.) by developing in tandem," he said via email.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

First look: Mayors press Biden on immigration

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A coalition of nearly 200 mayors and county executives is challenging Joe Biden and the incoming Congress to adopt a progressive immigration agenda that would give everyone a pathway to citizenship.

Why it matters: The group's goals, set out in a white paper released today, seem to fall slightly to the left of what the president-elect plans to propose on Inauguration Day — though not far — and come at a time of intense national polarization over immigration.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
6 mins ago - Health

Demand for coronavirus vaccines is outstripping supply

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Now that nearly half of the U.S. population could be eligible for coronavirus vaccines, America is facing the problem experts thought we’d have all along: demand for the vaccine is outstripping supply.

Why it matters: The Trump administration’s call for states to open up vaccine access to all Americans 65 and older and adults with pre-existing conditions may have helped massage out some bottlenecks in the distribution process, but it’s also led to a different kind of chaos.

Woman who allegedly stole laptop from Pelosi's office to sell to Russia is arrested

Photo: FBI

A woman accused of breaching the Capitol and planning to sell to Russia a laptop or hard drive she allegedly stole from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office was arrested in Pennsylvania's Middle District Monday, the Department of Justice said.

Driving the news: Riley June Williams, 22, is charged with illegally entering the Capitol as well as violent entry and disorderly conduct. She has not been charged over the laptop allegation and the case remains under investigation, per the DOJ.