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Photo: Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Companies including BP, Chevron and power giant Southern Company have formed a new coalition called the Energy Advance Center to work on carbon capture, storage and use.

Why it matters: Trapping CO2 from power plants and other industrial facilities is an important way to help eventually bring the steep emissions cuts needed to prevent the most dangerous levels of warming.

The two other companies listed in this newly public lobbying disclosure filing are:

  • Industrial systems giant Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America.
  • Denbury Resources, an oil company focuses on using CO2 for enhanced oil recovery from depleted reservoirs.
  • They're represented by the lobbying firm Hunton Andrews Kurth.

What they're saying: Very little right now. But Hunton Andrews Kurth partner Fred Eames described the new group this way in a statement to Axios:

"The Center is a voluntary association of energy companies, industrial energy users, and other energy-related entities formed to promote the energy industry’s interests in issues related to carbon capture and storage, to improve the greenhouse gas emissions profile of fossil fuels, and to enhance the economic opportunities from use of CO2 with benefits for the economy, energy security, and the environment."

The big picture: Deployment of carbon capture and storage tech has been slow to get off the ground. But a new U.S. law — part of the big February federal spending deal — expands tax incentives for direct sequestration or use of captured CO2 in enhanced oil recovery.

  • More broadly, International Energy Agency head Fatih Birol frequently says the amount of investment and activity worldwide around carbon capture is troublingly low.

One level deeper: Eames is former counsel to the House Energy and Commerce Committee and has previously worked with industry clients on carbon capture and storage through a group called the CCS Alliance.

  • That group has not reported any lobbying expenses in two years.

Go deeper

Cuomo: "No way I resign" after sexual harassment accusations

Cuomo at a Feb. 24 press conference. Photo: Seth Wenig/pool/AFP via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) was defiant on Sunday, stating again that he would not resign even as more former aides have come forward with allegations of sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior.

The big picture: Cuomo has denied all sexual harassment allegations against him and said that he "never inappropriately touched anybody." He acknowledged in a statement that "some of the things I have said have been misinterpreted as an unwanted flirtation." Some of the calls for Cuomo to resign have come from within the Democratic party.

N.Y. Times faces culture clashes as business booms

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

New York Times columnist David Brooks' resignation from a paid gig at a think tank on Saturday is the latest in a flurry of scandals that America's biggest and most successful newspaper company has endured in the past year.

Driving the news: Brooks resigned from the Aspen Institute following a BuzzFeed News investigation that uncovered conflicts of interest between his reporting and money he accepted from corporate donors for a project called "Weave" that he worked on at the nonprofit.

America rebalances its post-Trump news diet

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Nearly halfway through President Biden's first 100 days, data shows that Americans are learning to wean themselves off of news — and especially politics.

Why it matters: The departure of former President Trump's once-ubiquitous presence in the news cycle has reoriented the country's attention.

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