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Bare sand and dried tree trunks standing out at Theewaterskloof Dam, which has less than 20% of its water capacity. Photo: RODGER BOSCH/AFP/Getty Images

Cape Town’s mayoral committee member for water, Xanthea Limberg, said the city's taps are expected to go dry by April 22, per Reuters. That’s puts “Day Zero” fewer than 100 days away.

Picture this: Residents lining up for water, and soon, if there’s no rain to help replenish dams. Dams that supply nearly 4 million people are at under 20% capacity. Residents will have to line up when those levels reach 13.5%, per Reuters.

Why it’s happening:

Cape Town has spent three consecutive years in drought, and rains needed to replenish the dams have not come.

What they're doing:

  • Cape Town has implemented level 6 water restrictions and is encouraging people to live on less than 87 liters of water per day. But Limberg said some people aren’t heeding the recommendation, exacerbating the problem.
  • This past week the city launched an online water consumption map that allows people to check their neighbors’ water consumption habits, per ABC News.

Up next:

  • The city reportedly has a trial water collection site already and is considering adding 200 more. Residents would only be able to take 25 liters of water per day at maximum.

Go deeper

Salesforce rolls the dice on Slack

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Salesforce's likely acquisition of workplace messaging service Slack — not yet a done deal but widely anticipated to be announced Tuesday afternoon — represents a big gamble for everyone involved.

For Slack, challenged by competition from Microsoft, the bet is that a deeper-pocketed owner like Salesforce, with wide experience selling into large companies, will help the bottom line.

FBI stats show border cities are among the safest

Data: FBI, Kansas Bureau of Investigation; Note: This table includes the eight largest communities on the U.S.-Mexico border and eight other U.S. cities similar in population size and demographics; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

U.S. communities along the Mexico border are among the safest in America, with some border cities holding crime rates well below the national average, FBI statistics show.

Why it matters: The latest crime data collected by the FBI from 2019 contradicts the narrative by President Trump and others that the U.S.-Mexico border is a "lawless" region suffering from violence and mayhem.

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
2 hours ago - Science

The rise of military space powers

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Nations around the world are shoring up their defensive and offensive capabilities in space — for today's wars and tomorrow's.

Why it matters: Using space as a warfighting domain opens up new avenues for technologically advanced nations to dominate their enemies. But it can also make those countries more vulnerable to attack in novel ways.