A U.S. convoy of armored vehicles on the outskirts of the Syrian city Manbij. Photo: DELIL SOULEIMAN/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. military says an "improvised explosive device" killed two members of the U.S.-led coalition in Syria, one of whom was an American, and injured five others on Friday, according to the New York Times. Military officials did not specify further details regarding those killed or wounded.

Why it matters: The rare attack took place hours after a roadside bomb exploded in a tense area in the Arab-Kurdish town, Manbij, near the Turkish border, reports the AP, mciting a Syrian official. The targeting of the U.S.-led coalition, which includes 30 countries, could spark another moment of escalation in the Kurdish-Turkey conflict.

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FBI: Foreign actors likely to sow disinformation about delays in election results

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The FBI and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency released a public service announcement on Tuesday warning that mail-in ballots "could leave officials with incomplete results on election night," and that foreign actors are likely to spread disinformation about the delays.

The bottom line: The agencies called on the public to "critically evaluate the sources of the information they consume and to seek out reliable and verified information from trusted sources," including state and local election officials.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 6,882,969 — Total deaths: 200,477 — Total recoveries: 2,615,974 — Total tests: 95,846,925Map.
  3. Health: The U.S. reaches 200,000 coronavirus deaths — The CDC's crumbling reputation — America turns against coronavirus vaccine.
  4. Politics: Elected officials are failing us on much-needed stimulus.
  5. Business: Two-thirds of business leaders think pandemic will lead to permanent changes — Fed chair warns economy will feel the weight of expired stimulus.
  6. Sports: NFL fines maskless coaches.
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The big business of immigrant detention

Around 70% of all immigration detention centers are run by private companies, including the one at the heart of a new whistleblower complaint that alleges systemic medical neglect and malpractice.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the business of immigrant detention, including oversight and profit incentives, with Jonathan Blitzer, a staff writer for the New Yorker who’s covered the subject for years.

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