John Kerry, Arnold Schwarzenegger and Leonardo DiCaprio. Photos: Getty Images.

Former Secretary of State John Kerry is launching a coalition of high-profile names — including Arnold Schwarzenegger and Leonardo DiCaprio — aimed at building public support for tougher steps against global warming, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: The unveiling of the "World War Zero" coalition comes ahead of a big U.N. climate summit that begins in Madrid, Spain next week. The group's name, per the NYT, is meant to emphasize national security risks posed by warming and the "wartime mobilization" needed to rein in emissions.

Why you'll hear about this again: The many names involved in the effort include former Presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, Republicans such as John Kasich, the former governor of Ohio and musician Sting.

  • Kerry and Schwarzenegger will be on NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday morning.

How it works: The NYT reports that the group's goal is to hold millions of "climate conversations" with Americans of varying political views.

  • "Members will head to battleground states that are key to the 2020 election, but also to military bases where climate discussions are rare and to economically depressed areas that members say could benefit from clean energy job," Lisa Friedman reports.
  • Kerry tells the paper that the group will begin town meetings in January, but will not promote any specific policy plan.

The big picture: The launch comes days after the latest data showed how global emissions — which are still rising — are extraordinarily far off track from achieving the long-term goals of the Paris climate agreement.

Domestically, President Trump is pulling the U.S. out of the Paris deal and ending Obama-era initiatives, while his main Democratic rivals are pushing climate plans aimed at going much further than Obama.

Go deeper: Nothing is happening remotely fast enough to save the planet

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Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 21,020,216 — Total deaths: 761,393— Total recoveries: 13,048,303Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 5,289,323 — Total deaths: 167,948 — Total recoveries: 1,774,648 — Total tests: 64,831,306Map.
  3. Health: CDC: Survivors of COVID-19 have up to three months of immunity Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with vaccine — The pandemic's toll on mental health.
  4. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  5. Cities: Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light.
  6. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.

Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.

Facebook goes after Apple

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Facebook is seeking to force a face-off with Apple over its 30% in-app purchase commission fee, which Facebook suggests hurts small businesses struggling to get by during the pandemic.

The big picture: Facebook has never publicly gone after Apple, a key strategic partner, this aggressively. Both companies face antitrust scrutiny, which in Apple's case has centered on the very fee structure Facebook is now attacking.