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Attorney General Bill Barr said he expected criticism for his decisions surrounding the public release of the Mueller report and that he ultimately does not regret taking the job during an interview Friday with "CBS This Morning."

What he's saying:

"I realize we live in a crazy hyper-partisan period of time and I knew that it would only be a matter of time, if I was behaving responsibly and calling them as I see them, that I'd be attacked because nowadays people don't care about the merits or the substance. They only care about who it helps, who benefits, whether my side benefits or the other side benefits, everything is gauged by politics.
"And as I say that's antithetical to the way the department runs and any attorney general in this period is going to end up losing a lot of political capital and I realize that and that's one of the reasons that I ultimately was persuaded that I should take it on because I think at my stage in life, it really doesn't make any difference.
"I'm at the end of my career. ... Everyone dies and I am not — I don't believe in the Homeric idea that immortality comes by having odes sung about you over the centuries, you know?"
"People are saying that it's President Trump who's shredding our institutions. I really see no evidence of that. From my perspective, the idea of resisting a democratically elected president ... that's where the shredding of our norms and institutions is occurring."

Go deeper: White House sent Barr a letter blasting Mueller report as political

Go deeper

Updated 8 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden, Harris and nearly all the living former presidents and their spouses lay a wreath at Arlington National Cemetery.

Inaugural address: Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were inaugurated as president and vice president respectively in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Top Democrats and Republicans gathered for the peaceful transfer of power only two weeks after an unprecedented siege on the building by Trump supporters to disrupt certification of Biden's victory. Trump did not attend Wednesday's ceremony.