Top executives of Big Oil and investment companies ended a meeting Friday with Pope Francis by signing a joint statement supporting carbon pricing and transparent investments, according to the Vatican.

Driving the news: The shared statements signal a successful outcome for organizers, which included the Vatican and the University of Notre Dame, after last year’s initial meeting convened by Francis ended with no official, shared statement.

The intrigue: This document includes the statements and a complete list of signatories, which includes most of the world's biggest oil and gas companies — along with investment firms.

  • Yes, but: Actual change comes with action in boardrooms and governments — not meetings and statements. Time will tell whether this gathering really influences policies around the world and investments.

The big picture: Climate change has been a pillar of Francis’ leadership of the Roman Catholic Church. He wrote an encyclical — a papal letter sent to all bishops — on the importance of addressing the issue, a first in the history of the Church.

  • Since then, and particularly since President Trump entered the White House, oil companies have come under intense pressure — from investors and the public alike — to support action on climate change.

Go deeper: Big Oil teeters between enemy and ally in climate fight

Go deeper

Cleanup on aisle Biden

Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

After two gaffes and a low blow from President Trump questioning his faith, Joe Biden spent Thursday evening off his own message — clarifying comments and responding to attacks.

Why it matters: Biden’s responses reflect what we could see a lot more of in the next few months — cringeworthy comments and Trump smears, smacking into each other and pulling the Democrat off course.

2020 election strategy: Hire all the lawyers

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The coronavirus has sent overall U.S. unemployment into the double digits — but it's a sort of full-employment act for election law attorneys.

The big picture: The prospect of extended court fights over COVID-19-related voting changes, an absentee ballot avalanche, foreign interference and contested presidential results has prompted a hire-all-the-lawyers binge by candidates and campaigns — not just in swing states but around the country.

Right-wing media defanged by dissolving anti-Biden storylines

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The three biggest anti-Joe Biden storylines in right-wing media over the last year have either fizzled or are getting less online traction than they used to, according to data from NewsWhip provided exclusively to Axios.

Why it matters: This dynamic has rendered a formidable media ecosystem less effective in boosting President Trump as we move into the heart of the 2020 campaign.