Bernard J. Tyson with his wife, Denise Bradley-Tyson, 2017. Photo by Taylor Hill/FilmMagic via Getty Images

Kaiser Permanente announced on Sunday that its CEO and chairman Bernard J. Tyson has died unexpectedly at age 60.

What we know: Tyson died suddenly in his sleep after speaking at a tech gathering on Saturday, according to Fox Business.

What they're saying: "An outstanding leader, visionary and champion for high-quality, affordable health care for all Americans, Bernard was a tireless advocate for Kaiser Permanente, our members and the communities we serve," the California-based health care company said in a statement on Sunday, according to Yahoo Finance.

  • "Most importantly, Bernard was a devoted husband, father and friend. We all will miss his tremendous presence in our lives," the statement reads.

Background: Tyson became CEO of Kaiser Permanente, one of the nation's largest not-for-profit health care consortiums, in 2013.

  • The company had roughly 9 million members when Tyson assumed the position. It currently has around 12.3 million members.

The company's board of directors named Gregory A. Adams, executive vice president and group president, as interim chairman and CEO.

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