Oct 20, 2017

Before media firestorms, decades of assaults

One common trait shared by recent high-profile sexual assault scandals is that it took a major media event for many of the women to come forward with their stories. For some, the alleged assault happened decades ago.

How we collected the data: This visual is based on multiple press reports from other news organizations, all of which covered the alleged assaults in detail. To get more information on them, you can take a look at the underlying data and find the links to the news sources here.

Worth noting: Cosby, Ailes, O'Reilly and Weinstein were all condemned — and to an extent, punished — once the allegations against them were brought to light. One month after Trump's "Access Hollywood" tape leaked and more than 20 women came forward with allegations of sexual assault, he was elected president.

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Harvey Weinstein indicted on sex crimes in Los Angeles

Harvey Weinstein leaving a New York City court, Jan. 6. Photo: Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Harvey Weinstein was indicted Monday on sex crimes charges by prosecutors in Los Angeles, per AP.

The state of play: The new indictment came just hours after the start of Weinstein's separate New York trial on similar charges.

Go deeperArrowJan 6, 2020

Why 50+ women care about 2020

Data: AARP/Harris Poll; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new AARP survey by the Harris Poll examined what's driving women 50 and older ahead of next year's elections and found health care on top. The survey also found that older women’s concerns about Trump are eroding, but not upending, his support with Republicans and independents.

Why it matters: As the House of Representatives prepares to impeach the president, the priorities for this group of high-propensity voters are closer to home and different from what their male counterparts care most about.

Go deeperArrowDec 18, 2019

Women take the lead on donating to support female college sports

The Indiana Hoosiers celebrate after the NCAA Women's College Basketball game. Photo: Bobby Goddin/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Former female athletes are donating millions of dollars to build facilities, endow scholarships and support coaching positions at their alma maters, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Participation in women’s college sports teams is at an all time high, outnumbering men's sports for more than 20 years. And yet, the marketing and sponsorships from benefactors for college female teams has caught on slower than men's sports.

Go deeperArrowDec 25, 2019