JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon and other bank CEOs sworn in ahead of House Financial Services Committee hearing. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Members of the House Financial Services Committee asked CEOs of the biggest financial institutions — JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs, State Street, Citigroup, Bank of America, Morgan Stanley and BNY Mellon — about their relationships with the gun industry during a hearing on Wednesday, among other social and consumer-driven issues.

Details: In response to a question from Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) about whether JPMorgan would "adopt a formal policy" for its relationships with gun manufacturers, CEO Jamie Dimon defended the bank's current policy but said the company would "consider" adopting a responsible lending plan. In the wake of several mass shootings, Citigroup and Bank of America last year re-evaluated their business dealings with makers and sellers of firearms.

Questions from lawmakers largely focused on social issues, including CEO pay, diversity, overdraft fee policies and forced arbitration.

A notable exchange on pay: Rep. Nydia Velazquez (D-N.Y.) asked Citigroup CEO Michael Corbat how he would feel if he were the average Citi employee, who makes $49,766 versus his $24.2 million — a 486:1 ratio — per Bloomberg.

  • Corbat responded: "I would be hopeful that there's opportunity to continue to advance within the firm."

On diversity: None of the CEOs raised their hand to say they thought their likely successor would be a woman or person of color when asked by Rep. Al Green (D-Texas) to do so.

  • All except 2 — Dimon and Morgan Stanley CEO James Gorman — raised their hands to say it could happen within the next decade.

When asked about Brexit, not one of the CEOs said Brexit was a "systemic risk," but called it a challenge for the economy.

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Updated 20 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 33,880,896 — Total deaths: 1,012,964 — Total recoveries: 23,551,663Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 7,232,823 — Total deaths: 206,887 — Total recoveries: 2,840,688 — Total tests: 103,939,667Map.
  3. Education: School-aged children now make up 10% of all U.S COVID-19 cases.
  4. Health: Moderna says its coronavirus vaccine won't be ready until 2021
  5. Travel: CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S. waters — Airlines begin mass layoffs while clinging to hope for federal aid
  6. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  7. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.

CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S.

Cruise Ships docked in April at the port at Marina Long Beach due to a no-sail order in Long Beach, in California. Photo: Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

There have been at least 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like illness cases on cruise ships in U.S. waters, "in addition to at least 41 reported deaths," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said late Wednesday.

Driving the news: The CDC released the data from the period of March 1 through Sept. 29 in an emailed statement confirming the extension of a No Sail Order for cruise ships through Oct. 31, as first reported by Axios' Jonathan Swan on Tuesday in his article revealing CDC director Robert Redfield was overruled in a push to extend the order into 2021.

Ina Fried, author of Login
4 hours ago - Technology

Facebook removes Trump ads tying refugees to COVID-19

Photo Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook said Wednesday that it was removing a series of ads from President Trump's campaign that linked American acceptance of refugees with increased coronavirus risk, a connection Facebook says is without merit.

Why it matters: The ads were pulled after they received thousands of impressions and are a sign that the Trump campaign continues to test the limits of social media rules on false information.