Updated Jun 7, 2018

Atlanta ransomware hack could cost more than $9.5M

Photo: Getty Images

The March 22 ransomware attack on Atlanta, Georgia, could cost the city an additional $9.5 million in recovery funds, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: That’s likely not the final number of how much the cyberattack will cost the city. Although Atlanta’s administration hasn’t revealed a lot about the scope of the impact from the hack, we now know the cyberattack’s reach was larger than previously known, according to Atlantas’s Information Management head, Daphne Rackley, who said the list of what was affected is "growing every day." And the administrators are still working out total costs.

The impact: More than a third of the Atlanta’s 424 software programs are disabled, and some are mission critical, meaning they impact the city’s core functions. Police have lost records of dash cam footage and courts have lost decades of legal documents.

The big picture: Ransomware hacks are not showing signs of stopping any time soon. If states already strapped for cash become targets for similar attacks, this will become a very expensive ordeal — even if cities don't pay the ransom to gain back access to files or systems it was shut out of during the hack.

What to do: Many experts do not recommend cities pay ransoms in ransomware hacks since cities could still dish out potentially thousands of dollars and still be stuck in the hack. Updating software and not clicking on links in emails, or visiting suspicious web sites could prevent ransomware hacks from starting in the first place.

Go deeper

George Floyd updates

Protesters in Washington, D.C. on June 6. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Thousands of demonstrators are gathering in cities across the U.S. and around the world to protest the killing of George Floyd. Huge crowds have assembled in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and Chicago for full-day events.

Why it matters: Twelve days of nationwide protest in the U.S. has built pressure for states to make new changes on what kind of force law enforcement can use on civilians and prompted officials to review police conduct.

Why the coronavirus pandemic is hitting minorities harder

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The coronavirus’ disproportionate impact on black and Latino communities has become a defining part of the pandemic.

The big picture: That's a result of myriad longstanding inequities within the health care system and the American economy.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 6,804,044 — Total deaths: 362,678 — Total recoveries — 2,788,806Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 1,909,077 — Total deaths: 109,497 — Total recoveries: 491,706 — Total tested: 19,231,444Map.
  3. Public health: Some people are drinking and inhaling cleaning products in attempt to fight coronavirus, CDC says Fauci: "Very concerned" about spread of virus amid George Floyd protests — Cities offer free testing for protesters.
  4. Tech: The pandemic is accelerating next-generation disease diagnostics — Robotics looks to copy software-as-a-service model as use of robots accelerates.
  5. Business: Sports, film production in California to resume June 12 after 3-month hiatus.
  6. Education: Students and teachers flunked remote learning.