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Nickel refinery in Siberian town of Norilsk. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Getty Images

Temperatures in the small Siberian town of Verkhoyansk — normally one of the coldest places on the planet — reached 100.4°F on Saturday, likely the hottest temperature ever recorded in Siberia and north of the Arctic Circle, CBS News reports.

Driving the news: Multiple northern towns around the world have recorded scorching temperatures in recent days, including the city of Caribou, Maine, which on Friday tied its all-time record of 96°F.

  • Temperatures in Caribou were also well above 90°F on Saturday, almost matching temperatures in Miami, Florida, which has only reached 100°F one time since Miami began keeping temperature records, according to CBS.
  • The Arctic Circle begins at a latitude of 66.5°N. Verkhoyansk sits at 67.5°N.

How it works: The record temperatures are likely the combination of natural weather patterns and human-caused climate change resulting from the emission of greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide.

  • The greenhouse gases released from the burning of fossil fuels become trapped in the atmosphere and hold onto heat from the Sun, which gradually warms the Earth's atmosphere and surface.

The big picture: Some cities in western Siberia recorded temperatures 18°F above normal throughout May. As a whole, western Siberia averaged 10°F above normal that month.

  • The unprecedented summer in Siberia has ignited numerous fires in the region.
  • Last year, the northern Swedish town of Markusvinsa hit 94.6°F. The abnormal heat caused large Arctic fires, making 2019 the Arctic's worst fire season on record.
  • Overall, the Arctic is warming at more than two times the average rate of the globe.

Go deeper: The game theory of using geoengineering to fight climate change

Go deeper

Newsom to Trump at wildfire event: "Climate change is real"

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) pointedly told President Trump on Monday afternoon that climate change is "exacerbating" the wildfires currently ravaging the West Coast.

Why it matters: Trump has repeatedly insisted that the fires were "about forest management," while dismissing climate change. Newsom acknowledged to Trump that "we have not done justice on our forest management," but emphasized that climate change was making everything much worse. A number of politicians have criticized Trump and his administration for not properly addressing climate change.

Inhofe loudly sets Trump straight on defense bill

Sen. Jim Inhofe speaks with reporters in the Capitol last month. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senator Jim Inhofe told President Trump today he'll likely fail to get two big wishes in pending defense spending legislation, bellowing into his cellphone: "This is the only chance to get our bill passed," a source who overheard part of their conversation tells Axios.

Why it matters: Republicans are ready to test whether Trump's threats of vetoing the bill, which has passed every year for more than half a century, are empty.

Conspiracy theories blow back on Trump's White House

Sidney Powell. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

President Trump has rarely met a conspiracy theory he doesn't like, but he and other Republicans now worry the wild tales told by lawyers Sidney Powell and Lin Wood may cost them in Georgia's Senate special elections.

Why it matters: The two are telling Georgians not to vote for Republicans David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler because of a bizarre, baseless and potentially self-defeating theory: It's not worth voting because the Chinese Communist Party has rigged the voting machines.