"Angela, my poll numbers keep going down." Photo: Julien Mattia/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

In recent weeks, the trials and tribulations of Germany's Angela Merkel, the U.K.'s Theresa May and President Donald Trump have played out on the world stage.

The big question: How do they stack up with voters at home?

Trending upwards...

  • After a spat with Trump and his move to legalize marijuana, Canada's Justin Trudeau is trending upwards in the polls. He sits at 55%, per Ipsos.
  • Japan's Shinzo Abe, whose approval had tanked over corruption allegations, has surged to 52% per Nikkei ahead of a leadership race in September.

Holding steady...

  • Merkel remains Germany's most popular politician, with a recent poll putting her popularity at 48%.

Under water...

  • France's Emmanuel Macron has a 40% approval rate, per Ifop, and has been damaged by claims he's "president of the rich." Perhaps Sunday's World Cup win will help.
  • May is viewed favorably by just 25% of Brits, per YouGov. Fortunately for her, there are few popular alternatives.

Trump's approval sits at 43%, per the RCP polling average.

Go deeper

S&P 500's historic rebound leaves investors divided on future

Data: Money.net; Chart: Axios Visuals

The S&P 500 nearly closed at an all-time high on Wednesday and remains poised to go from peak to trough to peak in less than half a year.

By the numbers: Since hitting its low on March 23, the S&P has risen about 50%, with more than 40 of its members doubling, according to Bloomberg. The $12 trillion dollars of share value that vanished in late March has almost completely returned.

Newsrooms abandoned as pandemic drags on

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facing enormous financial pressure and uncertainty around reopenings, media companies are giving up on their years-long building leases for more permanent work-from-home structures. Others are letting employees work remotely for the foreseeable future.

Why it matters: Real estate is often the most expensive asset that media companies own. And for companies that don't own their space, it's often the biggest expense.

2 hours ago - Technology

Dark clouds envelop feel-good Pinterest

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Pinterest set out to be a bright spot in cutthroat Silicon Valley, but now stands to see its reputation forever tarnished by allegations of mistreatment and a toxic culture by women who held senior roles at the company.

Why it matters: Even a company known for progressive policy decisions and successfully combatting hateful and otherwise problematic content isn't immune to the systemic problems that have plagued many tech companies.