Law enforcement responds to active shooter in El Paso, Texas on Aug. 3. Photo: Joel Angel Juarez/AFP/Getty Images

Amnesty International advised U.S. visitors on Wednesday to avoid "cultural events, places of worship, schools, and shopping malls" due to "ongoing high levels of gun violence in the country."

The big picture: Japan, Uruguay and Venezuela released similar warnings to their citizens after recent mass shootings in California, Ohio and Texas, NPR reports. Ireland, Germany, France, New Zealand and Canada issued warnings over gun violence following the 2016 Pulse shooting and the 2017 shooting at Las Vegas' Harvest music festival.

  • "Depending on the traveler's gender identity, race, country of origin, ethnic background, or sexual orientation, they may be at higher risk of being targeted with gun violence, and should plan accordingly," Amnesty International included in its press release.
  • The organization recommended travelers "exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos," and to "avoid places where large numbers of people gather."

The bottom line: In the past 18 months, white-extremist active shooters in the U.S. have been responsible for 63 deaths in 7 episodes, including attacks on a Texas Walmart, a Florida high school, a Texas high school and a Pennsylvania synagogue, a N.Y. Times graphic shows.

Go deeper: Mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton force America to confront its hate problem

Go deeper

Column / Harder Line

How Europe’s green pandemic recovery will push the rest of the world

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Europe, long the most progressive continent when it comes to tackling climate change, is doubling down on this ambition to revive pandemic-ravaged economies.

Why it matters: The European Union is the world’s third-largest emitting region after the U.S. and China, but it’s not just that. These plans will push global corporate behavior and prod other governments by creating either templates to follow or protectionist battles (or both).

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 12,859,834 — Total deaths: 567,123 — Total recoveries — 7,062,085Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 3,297,501— Total deaths: 135,155 — Total recoveries: 1,006,326 — Total tested: 40,282,176Map.
  3. States: Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases with over 15,000 — NYC reports zero coronavirus deaths for first time since pandemic hit.
  4. Public health: Ex-FDA chief projects "apex" of South's coronavirus curve in 2-3 weeks — Coronavirus testing czar: Lockdowns in hotspots "should be on the table"
  5. Education: Betsy DeVos says schools that don't reopen shouldn't get federal funds — Pelosi accuses Trump of "messing with the health of our children."

Scoop: How the White House is trying to trap leakers

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President Trump's chief of staff, Mark Meadows, has told several White House staffers he's fed specific nuggets of information to suspected leakers to see if they pass them on to reporters — a trap that would confirm his suspicions. "Meadows told me he was doing that," said one former White House official. "I don't know if it ever worked."

Why it matters: This hunt for leakers has put some White House staffers on edge, with multiple officials telling Axios that Meadows has been unusually vocal about his tactics. So far, he's caught only one person, for a minor leak.