All stripes of renewable energy increased between 2016 and last year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

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Here is a handy card deck of what you need to know about America's different electricity sources. This is updated from our initial power mix rundown in July.

Why it matters: The recently updated EIA data, which is the federal government’s official breakdown of U.S. electricity, shows an increasingly diverse mix. That goes counter to warnings by Energy Secretary Rick Perry and other government officials that the grid is too reliant on one type of fuel.

By the numbers:
  • Solar went from 0.9% in EIA’s 2016 breakdown to 1.9% in 2017, with 0.6% of that being rooftop solar.
  • Wind’s share went from 5.6% to 6.3%.
  • Hydropower, a renewable energy that doesn’t get as much attention as wind or solar, ticked up from 6.5% to 7.5%.

To be sure: Regional mix of electricity can vary greatly, and even certain days can have more renewable energy or less. The importance of the EIA’s breakdown is that it captures the yearly average across the U.S., which shows changes over longer periods of time. For example, in 2008, EIA’s breakdown of electricity mix was much more heavily coal (48.2%) compared to today (30.1%.)

What’s next: My next Harder Line column — out Monday — will break down some complicated electricity terms. This is my next glossary installment, building off my inaugural glossary earlier this year on more general energy and climate terms. Stay tuned!

Go deeper

Downtown Chicago hit by widespread looting

Police officers inspect a damaged Best Buy in Chicago that was looted and vandalized. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chicago police responded to hundreds of people looting stores and causing widespread property damage in the city's downtown overnight, resulting in at least one exchange of gunfire, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The state of play: Police superintendent David Brown said the event was a coordinated response after an officer shot a suspect on Sunday evening, per CBS Chicago.

McDonald's sues former CEO, alleging he lied about relationships with employees

Former McDonald's CEO Steve Easterbrook. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

McDonald's on Monday sued its former CEO Steve Easterbrook, seeking to recoup tens of millions in severance benefits while alleging he took part in and concealed undisclosed relationships with company employees, per the New York Times.

Why it matters: Corporations have traditionally chosen to ignore executive misbehavior to avoid bad press, but they have become more proactive — especially with the rise of the #MeToo and Black Lives Matter movements — in addressing issues head-on.

The transformation of the Fed

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The Federal Reserve is undergoing an overhaul. Conceived to keep inflation in check and oversee the country's money supply, the central bank is now essentially directing the economy and moving away from worries about rising prices.

What we're hearing: The move to act less quickly and forcefully to tamp down on inflation has been in the works for years, but some economists fear that the Fed is moving too far from its original mandate.