Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!
Expand chart

Data: SurveyMonkey poll conducted from Oct. 23 to Oct. 26. Poll data. Poll methodology; Chart: Axios Visuals

The bigger picture: This week is a showdown on the topic with Facebook, Google, and Twitter testifying on the Capitol Hill for the first time in years to answer for Russian actors' influence on their platforms to directly target U.S. voters.

Top lawyers from Facebook, Google and Twitter will spend the next few days answering questions about how the technology they've long touted as a boon for free speech was manipulated by Russian operatives to disrupt the 2016 election. This week is an inflection point for the image of these three internet platforms that have been held up as pinnacles of innovation for the better part of a decade.

  • On Tuesday, Facebook and Twitter's general counsels and a Google security exec testify before a subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee.
  • Wednesday brings a double header: the general counsels from all three companies testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee in the morning, and the House Intelligence Committee in the afternoon.

Silicon Valley still enjoys pretty rosy views from most Americans: 84% say U.S. technology companies have had a positive effect on the U.S. economy and 71% say technology has benefited society — with Republicans and Democrats equally likely to be in these camps. But attitudes are shifting, according to the survey.

  • Asked whether social media "does more to help promote democracy and free speech or does more to hurt democracy and free speech," 51% of those surveyed said it did more hurt to democracy and 45% said it did more to help. Notably, large majorities among African-Americans and Hispanics said social media helps democracy, while a majority of white respondents say it hurts.
  • When it comes to policing the platforms for foreign influence, 43% of people said that they trust neither the federal government or tech companies to keep foreign influence out of elections on social media — while just 20% said they trust them both.
  • Go deeper: Americans don't trust tech firms or feds to police Russian meddling in U.S. politics

Best case scenario for tech: If lawmakers buy the transparency measures that some of the companies have rapidly rolled out in preparation for the hearing, all three come off as responsive to investigators' questions — and users don't care enough to change how they use the platforms.

  • They'll also benefit if Mueller's indictments happen early in the week, drowning out the press around the hearings.

Worst case scenario for tech: Remember that photo with the seven tobacco CEOs being sworn in to testify that cigarettes aren't addictive? If the companies' legal executives look like they're obfuscating or dodging questions, that will inflame an already tense investigation. If users become more wary of Google or Facebook or Twitter, the companies' longtime popularity could take a hit.

Go deeper

Updated 53 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Biden holds first phone call with Putin, raises Navalny arrest

Putin takes a call in 2017. Photo: Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty

President Biden on Tuesday held his first call since taking office with Vladimir Putin, pressing the Russian president on the arrest of opposition leader Alexey Navalny and the Russia-linked hack on U.S. government agencies.

The state of play: Biden also raised arms control, bounties allegedly placed on U.S. troops in Afghanistan and the war in Ukraine, according to a White House readout. The statement said Biden and Putin agreed maintain "consistent communication," and that Biden stressed the U.S. would "act firmly in defense of its national interests in response to actions by Russia that harm us or our allies."

Biden signs racial equity executive orders

Joe Biden prays at Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on September 3, 2020, in the aftermath of the police shooting of Jacob Blake. PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed executive orders on housing and ending the Justice Department's use of private prisons as part of what the White House is calling his “racial equity agenda.”

The big picture: Biden needs the support of Congress to push through police reform or new voting rights legislation. The executive orders serve as his down payment to immediately address systemic racism while he focuses on the pandemic.