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Data: SurveyMonkey poll conducted from Oct. 23 to Oct. 26. Poll data. Poll methodology; Chart: Axios Visuals

The bigger picture: This week is a showdown on the topic with Facebook, Google, and Twitter testifying on the Capitol Hill for the first time in years to answer for Russian actors' influence on their platforms to directly target U.S. voters.

Top lawyers from Facebook, Google and Twitter will spend the next few days answering questions about how the technology they've long touted as a boon for free speech was manipulated by Russian operatives to disrupt the 2016 election. This week is an inflection point for the image of these three internet platforms that have been held up as pinnacles of innovation for the better part of a decade.

  • On Tuesday, Facebook and Twitter's general counsels and a Google security exec testify before a subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee.
  • Wednesday brings a double header: the general counsels from all three companies testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee in the morning, and the House Intelligence Committee in the afternoon.

Silicon Valley still enjoys pretty rosy views from most Americans: 84% say U.S. technology companies have had a positive effect on the U.S. economy and 71% say technology has benefited society — with Republicans and Democrats equally likely to be in these camps. But attitudes are shifting, according to the survey.

  • Asked whether social media "does more to help promote democracy and free speech or does more to hurt democracy and free speech," 51% of those surveyed said it did more hurt to democracy and 45% said it did more to help. Notably, large majorities among African-Americans and Hispanics said social media helps democracy, while a majority of white respondents say it hurts.
  • When it comes to policing the platforms for foreign influence, 43% of people said that they trust neither the federal government or tech companies to keep foreign influence out of elections on social media — while just 20% said they trust them both.
  • Go deeper: Americans don't trust tech firms or feds to police Russian meddling in U.S. politics

Best case scenario for tech: If lawmakers buy the transparency measures that some of the companies have rapidly rolled out in preparation for the hearing, all three come off as responsive to investigators' questions — and users don't care enough to change how they use the platforms.

  • They'll also benefit if Mueller's indictments happen early in the week, drowning out the press around the hearings.

Worst case scenario for tech: Remember that photo with the seven tobacco CEOs being sworn in to testify that cigarettes aren't addictive? If the companies' legal executives look like they're obfuscating or dodging questions, that will inflame an already tense investigation. If users become more wary of Google or Facebook or Twitter, the companies' longtime popularity could take a hit.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 32,870,631 — Total deaths: 994,534 — Total recoveries: 22,749,163Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 7,079,689 — Total deaths: 204,499 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

How the Supreme Court could decide the election

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Supreme Court isn't just one of the most pressing issues in the presidential race — the justices may also have to decide parts of the election itself.

Why it matters: Important election-related lawsuits are already making their way to the court. And close results in swing states, with disputes over absentee ballots, set up the potential for another Bush v. Gore scenario, election experts say.

Graham hopes his panel will approve Amy Coney Barrett by late October

Sen. Lindsey Graham during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 24, 2020 in Washington, DC. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) told Fox News Saturday he expects confirmation hearings on Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court to start Oct. 12 and for his panel to approve her by Oct. 26.

Why it matters: That would mean the final confirmation vote could take place on the Senate floor before the Nov. 3 presidential election.