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Industrial pollution pours from an oil refinery Jan. 8, 2021, near New Castle, Delaware. Photo: Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

Americans of color are disproportionally and pervasively affected by fine particulate air pollution (PM2.5), the nation's most deadly pollutant, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances.

Why it matters: PM2.5 exposure in the U.S. causes roughly 85,000 to 200,000 more deaths of all Americans than anticipated, the study notes.

  • President Biden has made addressing the disproportionate pollution burdens that poor communities and people of color face a priority for his administration.

Be smart: Particulate matter denotes a "mixture of solid particles and liquid droplets found in the air," and can include dust, soot or smoke, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

The big picture: The study found that Black, Latino, Asian and Native Americans face higher PM2.5 exposure than white Americans, regardless of income level.

  • Much of this exposure is due to their proximity to industry and construction sites, gasoline vehicles and diesel vehicles.
  • "This phenomenon is systemic, holding for nearly all major sectors, as well as across states and urban and rural areas, income levels, and exposure levels." the study states.

What they're saying: “The deck is stacked against people of color, for almost every emission source,” Joshua Apte, one of the study's authors, told the Washington Post in an interview.

  • “The recipe we’ve had for improving air quality for the last 50 years, which has worked well for the country overall, is not a good recipe for solving environmental inequality.”

Go deeper

3,000 unruly passenger reports made to FAA this year

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Airlines have reported some 3,000 cases of unruly behavior by passengers to the Federal Aviation Administration this year — including 2,300 for refusing to comply with face mask mandates, the FAA announced Monday.

Why it matters: Passenger numbers remain below pre-pandemic levels. But the FAA is investigating the highest number of suspected federal law violations since it began recording unruly passenger incidents in 1995, per ABC News.

Cashier killed after face mask policy dispute in Georgia grocery store

An Atlanta area grocery store cashier was killed and three other people were injured in a shooting following a dispute over a face mask policy in the supermarket Monday, police said.

Driving the news: DeKalb County Sheriff Melody Maddox said during a news conference that the female cashier was working at the Big Bear Supermarket in Decatur when she was shot following a "confrontation" over the wearing of masks.

House panel to investigate Trump-era DOJ data seizures

Photo: James Devaney via Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee will launch a formal probe into the Trump-era Justice Department's seizure of data from devices belonging to members of Congress, their aides, journalists and then-White House counsel, panel chair Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) announced Monday.

Why it matters: Though it's so far unclear if the cases are related, they raise "serious constitutional and separation of power concerns," Nadler said in a statement.