Illustration: Rebecca Zisser / Axios

Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase are expected to pick the CEO for their health care partnership within the next two months, according to a source familiar with the process.

Big picture: The candidate pool includes both active and out-of-work CEOs, with both public and private company experience represented.

The source also tells Axios that several media outlets misread the original announcement, which said the independent company would be "free from profit-making incentives and constraints." This does not mean that the company will be a non-profit, as some reported. Instead, it simply won't focus on realizing profits — plowing excess cash back into the company (much like Amazon has been known to do).

  • This profit issue has exposed some cultural fissures between the co-founding partners, as both Berkshire and JPM are said to have struggled a bit to internalize the not-for-profit concept.

While the venture will initially focus on health care coverage for employees of the founding companies, all intentions are to expand to other large enterprises.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 32,881,747 — Total deaths: 994,821 — Total recoveries: 22,758,171Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 7,079,909 — Total deaths: 204,503 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

Durbin on Barrett confirmation: "We can’t stop the outcome"

Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said on ABC's "This Week" Sunday that Senate Democrats can “slow” the process of confirming Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett “perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at the most," but that they "can’t stop the outcome."

Why it matters: Durbin confirmed that Democrats have "no procedural silver bullet" to stop Senate Republicans from confirming Barrett before the election, especially with only two GOP senators — Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine — voicing their opposition. Instead, Democrats will likely look to retaliate after the election if they win control of the Senate and White House.

The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge announced in an op-ed Sunday that he would be voting for Joe Biden.

Why it matters: Ridge, who was also the first secretary of homeland security under George W. Bush, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.