A Yemeni child looking out at buildings that were damaged in an air strike in southern Yemen in March. Photo: Ahmad Al-Basha/AFP/Getty Images

Two missile strikes on a wedding party in Yemen on Sunday killed at least 33 people — including 17 women and children — and left 41 injured, CNN reports.

Why it matters: Per CBS, the strike allegedly came from the Saudi-led coalition, which has been fighting Houthi rebels in Yemen since 2015 and received arms support from the U.S. The coalition has been blamed for not working hard enough to avoid civilian casualties in what has been called the world's worst humanitarian crisis. A spokesman for the coalition, Colonel Turki al Maliki told CNN: "We take this report very seriously and it will be fully investigated as all reports of this nature are."

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New York daily coronavirus cases top 1,000 for first time since June

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

New York on Friday reported more than 1,000 new coronavirus cases for the first since June.

Why it matters: The New York City metropolitan area was seen as the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic throughout the spring. But strict social distancing and mask mandates helped quell the virus' spread, allowing the state to gradually reopen.

Updated 45 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 32,647,382 — Total deaths: 990,473 — Total recoveries: 22,527,593Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 7,053,171 — Total deaths: 204,093 — Total recoveries: 2,727,335 — Total tests: 99,488,275Map.
  3. States: U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

America on edge as unrest rises

Louisville on Wednesday. Photo: Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Rarely have national security officials, governors, tech CEOs and activists agreed as broadly and fervently as they do about the possibility of historic civil unrest in America.

Why it matters: The ingredients are clear for all to see — epic fights over racism, abortion, elections, the virus and policing, stirred by misinformation and calls to action on social media, at a time of stress over the pandemic.