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2016’s record heat not possible without climate change, says report

Somalians receive water as extreme drought threatens to leave many people hungry and vulnerable to disease epidemics, in Bay, Somalia on April 2, 2017
Somalians receive water on April 2, 2017 during extreme drought. Photo: Arif Hudaverdi Yaman / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

At least three instances of extreme weather would not have happened without climate change, according to the American Meterological Society’s annual report on extreme weather and climate change. Past reports found certain weather events were ‘influenced’ or made more frequent by climate change, but the tools researchers used weren’t powerful enough to measure just how much climate change played a role. This is the first time the report has definitively pointed the finger at global warming.

Why it matters: These weather anomalies are becoming more common, say the report authors, and they can have massive health and economic impacts. If the role climate change played in causing them can be pinpointed, researchers may be able to better predict how climate change might impact our future. For example, by understanding how marine heat waves change weather, scientists were able to predict the 2016/2017 Somalian drought, and mitigate some of the loss of life.