Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg defended Facebook's content moderation policies in an "Axios on HBO" interview, noting that the company proactively removed roughly 90% of hate speech content from April to June this year.

Driving the news: High-profile ad boycotts held over the summer pressured Facebook to act more forcefully against hate speech, although the efforts had little effect on the company's revenue.

What he's saying: It's more difficult to train AI to identify videos of racist attacks, and to understand the intent behind those videos, than to delete posts that promote terrorism or nudity, Zuckerberg said.

  • "Are they posting that video with an intent to encourage people to copy that act and carry out their own racist attacks? Or are they condemning it? Because if they're condemning it, then maybe that should be allowed. But if they're trying to encourage people to copy it, then that's obviously an issue."

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Ina Fried, author of Login
Sep 17, 2020 - Technology

Behind Facebook's giant bet on hardware

Photos: Facebook

Facebook's foray into virtual and augmented reality, which it doubled down on this week, is a bet on where the future of online social interaction is heading. But even more important to Facebook, it's also a plan to make sure the company owns a big piece of whatever platform ultimately supplants the smartphone.

Why it matters: In the smartphone era, Facebook has found itself at the mercy of Apple and — to a lesser degree — Google and Android phone makers. The company doesn't want to see history repeat itself.

Biden: The next president should decide on Ginsburg’s replacement

Joe Biden. Photo: Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Joe Biden is calling for the winner of November's presidential election to select Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement on the Supreme Court.

What he's saying: "[L]et me be clear: The voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider," Biden said. "This was the position the Republican Senate took in 2016 when there were almost 10 months to go before the election. That's the position the United States Senate must take today, and the election's only 46 days off.

Trump, McConnell to move fast to replace Ginsburg

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump will move within days to nominate his third Supreme Court justice in just three-plus short years — and shape the court for literally decades to come, top Republican sources tell Axios.

Driving the news: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Republicans are ready to move to confirm Trump's nominee before Election Day, just 46 days away, setting up one of the most consequential periods of our lifetimes, the sources say.