Mark Zuckerberg takes a selfie with a group of entrepreneurs and innovators after a roundtable discussio in St. Louis. Photo: Jeff Roberson / AP

"Zuckerberg nears end of US tour, wants to boost small biz," by AP Tech Writer Barbara Ortutay. "Facebook says more than 70 million small businesses use its service. Only 6 million of them advertise."

What's next: After a pilot in Detroit, Zuckerberg announced a new program, Community Boost, to help small businesses and "bolster individual technical skills both on and off Facebook" The group "will visit 30 U.S. cities next year and offer ... free training on a range of digital skills ... coding, building websites and ... using Facebook for their business." (Axios' Sara Fischer has more on the announcement here.)

Zuck's year: "The 33-year-old CEO has spent the past year visiting states he hadn't been to yet to learn more from regular people and local communities — stopping by an opioid treatment center, an oil rig and a seafood processing plant along the way. He has two more states left, Kansas and Missouri."

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Photo: Peter Zay/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

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