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Photo: Aytac Unal/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Google CEO Sundar Pichai refuted conservative claims of search bias in front of Congress this week. Here are five other stories in tech you may have missed.

Catch up quick: YouTube took down more than 58 million videos that violated its policies; nearly half of cloud databases aren't encrypted; Facebook wants to become a streaming destination; Apple courts publishers for new Apple News bundle; and Bitcoin spammers sent bomb threats to businesses and schools worldwide.

YouTube took down more than 58 million videos and 224 million comments in Q3 that violated policies (Reuters)

  • Why it matters: Lawmakers and interest groups in the U.S., Europe and Asia have been pressuring YouTube, Twitter and other social media platforms to be better and faster at removing content that incites violence and violates their policies. YouTube has instated quarterly reports about its efforts.

Nearly half of cloud databases aren't encrypted

  • Why it matters: Any important database should be encrypted. That's not purely a cloud problem. There are inherent security advantages and a few disadvantages to the cloud, but the bottom line is that no matter where you put data, basic security hygiene is still important. — Axios' Joe Uchill

Facebook is in talks to become a streaming destination (Recode)

  • Why it matters: Facebook is trying to keep users on its platform by striking a deal with pay-to-watch channels — including HBO, Showtime and Starz — just like Amazon and Apple. Similar to its e-commerce and dating experiments, streaming video could help bring in revenue.

Apple courts nervous publishers for new Apple News bundle

  • Why it matters: Media companies, particularly those with dwindling print income, are desperate for new revenue but afraid of giving up control. Apple is a tempting partner, but publishers are wary of participating in "all-in-one" services that take a slice of subscription fees and control distribution.

Bitcoin spammers sent bomb threats to businesses, schools worldwide (The Verge)

  • Why it matters: The threats, which show no evidence of any explosives or detonated sites, asked for Bitcoin ransom and caused many evacuations and law enforcement investigations throughout the U.S., Canada and New Zealand.

Go deeper

15 mins ago - Politics & Policy

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Minority Mitch still setting Senate agenda

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Chuck Schumer may be majority leader, yet in many ways, Mitch McConnell is still running the Senate show — and his counterpart is about done with it.

Why it matters: McConnell rolled over Democrats unapologetically, and kept tight control over his fellow Republicans, while in the majority. But he's showing equal skill as minority leader, using political jiujitsu to convert a perceived weakness into strength.