May 6, 2017

Young women are more likely to find a job than young men

The Economic Policy Institute analyzed how the great recession has impacted young people's employment rates. Over the past year, there has been a growing unemployment gap between young men and young women. In 2016, the unemployment rate for women continued to decrease, while unemployment for men has worsened.

Head scratcher: Elise Gould, one of the study's authors, tells Axios that although there's a smaller percentage of women participating in the workforce, the share of those employed is higher for women than for men. "I can't think of any other population group where that is true," Gould said.

One big reason for fewer women participating in the workforce is motherhood or even older women caring for their parents. But, as Gould hypothesized, 21-24 year olds are far less likely to have kids.

Data: Economic Policy Institute; Note: Data reflects 12-month moving average of college graduates age 21–24 who are not enrolled in further schooling; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Go deeper

Why 50+ women care about 2020

Data: AARP/Harris Poll; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new AARP survey by the Harris Poll examined what's driving women 50 and older ahead of next year's elections and found health care on top. The survey also found that older women’s concerns about Trump are eroding, but not upending, his support with Republicans and independents.

Why it matters: As the House of Representatives prepares to impeach the president, the priorities for this group of high-propensity voters are closer to home and different from what their male counterparts care most about.

Go deeperArrowDec 18, 2019

Women take the lead on donating to support female college sports

The Indiana Hoosiers celebrate after the NCAA Women's College Basketball game. Photo: Bobby Goddin/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Former female athletes are donating millions of dollars to build facilities, endow scholarships and support coaching positions at their alma maters, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Participation in women’s college sports teams is at an all time high, outnumbering men's sports for more than 20 years. And yet, the marketing and sponsorships from benefactors for college female teams has caught on slower than men's sports.

Go deeperArrowDec 25, 2019

Lacrosse and track and field are on the rise

Reproduced from NCAA Research; Chart: Axios Visuals

Over the past decade, the NCAA men's and women's sports with the largest net gains in participating teams, across all divisions, are lacrosse and track and field, per NCAA data.

The other side: Gymnastics, rifle and skiing all saw a decline in both men's and women's programs, while tennis, fencing, water polo and women's rowing (men's rowing isn't sanctioned by the NCAA) saw virtually no increase.

Go deeper: