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Young men are sliding to the bottom of the income scale

Paul Sancya / AP

"The loss of blue-collar jobs ... is forcing more men into low-wage service jobs, and in some cases causing them to drop out of the workforce altogether," according to a Boston Globe front-pager by Katie Johnston:

An analysis last month by the U.S. Census Bureau ("The Changing Economics and Demographics of Young Adulthood: 1975–2016") found that many young men have fallen to the bottom of the income scale, "despite the fact that they are better educated and working full time at the same rate."

  • What caused it: "Wages have stagnated, while the cost of living and student debt have skyrocketed, and college graduates are taking lower-level jobs ... [M]en are being hit particularly hard, as many of them are forced to take contract or part-time work."
  • Key fact: "The jobs that are growing the fastest ... are concentrated in female-dominated professions, such as health care."
  • Why it matters: "Many young men — defined by the Census Bureau as ages 25 to 34 — are starting out their working lives at a distinct disadvantage, compared with previous generations. And as more of them live at home and delay marriage, young adulthood has started looking much different than it used to."
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