Paul Sancya / AP

"The loss of blue-collar jobs ... is forcing more men into low-wage service jobs, and in some cases causing them to drop out of the workforce altogether," according to a Boston Globe front-pager by Katie Johnston:

An analysis last month by the U.S. Census Bureau ("The Changing Economics and Demographics of Young Adulthood: 1975–2016") found that many young men have fallen to the bottom of the income scale, "despite the fact that they are better educated and working full time at the same rate."

  • What caused it: "Wages have stagnated, while the cost of living and student debt have skyrocketed, and college graduates are taking lower-level jobs ... [M]en are being hit particularly hard, as many of them are forced to take contract or part-time work."
  • Key fact: "The jobs that are growing the fastest ... are concentrated in female-dominated professions, such as health care."
  • Why it matters: "Many young men — defined by the Census Bureau as ages 25 to 34 — are starting out their working lives at a distinct disadvantage, compared with previous generations. And as more of them live at home and delay marriage, young adulthood has started looking much different than it used to."

Go deeper

The next cliff for the unemployed

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A program supporting Americans who are typically ineligible for unemployment benefits will expire at the end of the year, with millions still relying on it as the labor market sputters.

Why it matters: The result could be catastrophic for the economic recovery that Wall Street fears is already fragile.

The apocalypse scenario

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Democratic lawyers are preparing to challenge any effort by President Trump to swap electors chosen by voters with electors selected by Republican-controlled legislatures. One state of particular concern: Pennsylvania, where the GOP controls the state house.

Why it matters: Trump's refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer of power, together with a widely circulated article in The Atlantic about how bad the worst-case scenarios could get, is drawing new attention to the brutal fights that could jeopardize a final outcome.

Federal judge rules Trump administration can't end census early

Census workers outside Lincoln Center in New York. Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images

A federal judge ruled late Thursday that the Trump administration could not end the 2020 census a month early.

Why it matters: The decision states that an early end — on Sept. 30, instead of Oct. 31 — would likely produce inaccuracies and thus impact political representation and government funding around the country.

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