Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

An estimated 25-30 million people are caught in the middle of the coronavirus economy — they’re unable to work from home but also face a high risk of severe infection.

Why it matters: The impossible choice between lives and livelihoods falls mainly to lower-wage workers in service industries.

By the numbers: According to Bureau of Labor Statistics data published before the pandemic hit, slightly more than two-thirds of American workers cannot work virtually.

  • There are 38 million workers who are at risk of severe illness due to COVID because of underlying health conditions.
  • Another 12 million high-risk adults are not working, but live with someone who is.
  • That means roughly 25 to 30 million high risk workers cannot work virtually.
  • The number may be an under-estimate because pre-existing conditions are more prevalent among lower-income people, who are less likely to be able to work at home.

Between the lines: If you work for any number of public-facing small businesses — an auto body shop or a dry cleaner or a pizza place — your boss will need you back at work for the business to function, but interaction with customers will likely increase your risk of infection.

  • Many of these same workers also will rely on public transportation to get to work.

What’s next: The Trump administration is considering a back-to-work bonus, which could put more money in vulnerable workers’ pockets while also making them feel more pressure to return to work as soon as possible,

Go deeper

Jun 25, 2020 - Health

CDC expands list of who's most at risk for the coronavirus

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded its warnings Thursday to include more demographic groups at risk for the coronavirus such as younger people who are obese and who have underlying health problems.

Why it matters: The shift reflects what states and hospitals have been seeing since the pandemic began, which is that young people can get seriously ill from COVID-19. Much of the directive was focused on those with preexisting conditions and individuals who are 65 or older.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 11,679,808 — Total deaths: 539,764 — Total recoveries — 6,348,785Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 2,953,423 — Total deaths: 130,546 — Total recoveries: 924,148 — Total tested: 36,032,329Map.
  3. States: Arizona reports record 117 deaths in 24 hours.
  4. Public health: Trump administration invests $2 billion for drug treatments.
  5. Business: Breaking down the PPP disclosure debacle
  6. World: Brazil's President Bolsonaro tests positive— India reports third-highest case count in the world.

Mary Trump book: How she leaked Trump financials to NYT

Simon & Schuster

In her new memoir, President Trump's niece reveals how she leaked hordes of confidential Trump family financial documents to the New York Times in an effort to expose her uncle, whom she portrays as a dangerous sociopath.

Why it matters: Trump was furious when he found out recently that Mary Trump, a trained psychologist, would be publishing a tell-all memoir. And Trump's younger brother, Robert, tried and failed to block the publication of "Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man."