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Woody Allen in July 2019 in San Sebastián, Spain. Photo: Europa Press News/Europa Press via Getty Images

The memoir of film director Woody Allen, who has been accused of molesting his adopted daughter in the 1990s, was dropped by publisher Hachette Book Group on Friday.

Driving the news: Hachette employees protested the book "Apropos of Nothing" on Thursday by staging a walkout, per the New York Times. The publisher announced on Monday plans for the memoir to be released under its Grand Central brand on April 7.

"The decision to cancel Mr. Allen’s book was a difficult one. At HBG we take our relationships with authors very seriously, and do not cancel books lightly.  We have published and will continue to publish many challenging books.  As publishers, we make sure every day in our work that different voices and conflicting points of views can be heard."
— Hachette Book Group spokesperson Jimmy Franco, in a statement to Axios

What they're saying: Allen's son, investigative reporter Ronan Farrow, encouraged Hachette to "conduct a thorough fact check of Woody Allen's account" earlier this week, and said his sister, Dylan Farrow, was never contacted to respond to denials or mischaracterizations of Allen's alleged abuse.

"I was disappointed to learn through press reports that Hachette, my publisher, acquired Woody Allen's memoir after other major publishers refused to do so, and concealed the decision from me and its own employees while we were working on Catch and Kill — a book about how powerful men, including Woody Allen, avoid accountability for sexual abuse. Hachette did not fact check the Woody Allen book."
— investigative reporter Ronan Farrow, in an Instagram post earlier this week

Go deeper: Woody Allen files $68 million against Amazon Studios

Go deeper

Janet Yellen is back

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Hannelore Foerster/Getty Images

A face familiar to Wall Street is back as a central player that this time will need to steer the country out of a deep economic crisis.

Driving the news: President-elect Joe Biden is preparing to nominate former Fed chair Janet Yellen to be Treasury secretary.

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Charles Koch: I "screwed up"

In his first on-camera interview in four years, Charles Koch told "Axios on HBO" that he "screwed up by being partisan," rather than approaching his network's big-spending political action in a more nonpartisan way.

Why it matters: Koch — chairman and CEO of Koch Industries, which Forbes yesterday designated as America's largest private company — has been the left's favorite face of big-spending political action.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
3 hours ago - Health

What overwhelmed hospitals look like

A healthcare professional suits up to enter a COVID-19 patient's room in the ICU at Van Wert County Hospital in Ohio. Photo: Megan Jelinger/AFP

Utah doctors are doing what they say is the equivalent of rationing care. Intensive care beds in Minnesota are nearly full. And the country overall continues to break hospitalization records — all as millions of Americans travel to spend Thanksgiving with friends and family.

Why it matters: America's health care workers are exhausted, and the sickest coronavirus patients aren't receiving the kind of care that could make the difference between living and dying.

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