Stories

The dangers men don't see

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Three high-profile murders in recent months shared two common factors: 1) The victims were women engaged in physical activity outdoors; 2) They were killed by men, seemingly at random.

Why it matters: The past few years, most recently the #MeToo movement, have exposed a major gap in what men know about what women face — and the common knowledge women are taught about how to deal with these dangers.

Between the lines: It’s not a new phenomenon for women to feel unsafe being outdoors by themselves. But recent instances are reminders of how often women feel targeted or singled-out in a variety of settings, even those that are most familiar. 

This ranges from catcalling on the street, to harassment in the office, all the way to physical violence against people who are just trying to live their lives.

The big picture: This is what women are talking about when they wear headphones while walking down the street, take a cab short distances at night, or when they persistently check with their friends to be sure they got home all right.