Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Three high-profile murders in recent months shared two common factors: 1) The victims were women engaged in physical activity outdoors; 2) They were killed by men, seemingly at random.

Why it matters: The past few years, most recently the #MeToo movement, have exposed a major gap in what men know about what women face — and the common knowledge women are taught about how to deal with these dangers.

Between the lines: It’s not a new phenomenon for women to feel unsafe being outdoors by themselves. But recent instances are reminders of how often women feel targeted or singled-out in a variety of settings, even those that are most familiar. 

This ranges from catcalling on the street, to harassment in the office, all the way to physical violence against people who are just trying to live their lives.

The big picture: This is what women are talking about when they wear headphones while walking down the street, take a cab short distances at night, or when they persistently check with their friends to be sure they got home all right.

Go deeper

Students say they'll sacrifice fun if they can return to campus

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

College students overwhelmingly plan to return to campus this fall if their schools are open — and they claim they'll sit out the fun even if it's available, according to a new College Reaction/Axios poll.

Why it matters: For many, even an experience devoid of the trappings of college life is still a lot better than the alternative.

39 mins ago - Health

Florida's coronavirus outbreak is getting worse

Reproduced from The COVID Tracking Project; Chart: Axios Visuals

Florida is the new domestic epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, and it's on track to keep getting worse.

By the numbers: Of the 20 U.S. metro areas with the highest daily case growth, nine are in Florida, according to Nephron Research.

Jeff Sessions loses Alabama Senate primary runoff

Jeff Sessions. Photo: Michael DeMocker/Getty Images

Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions has lost the Republican nomination for Senate to Tommy Tuberville in Alabama in Tuesday night’s primary runoff, AP reports.

Why it matters: Sessions had been the underdog in the race against former Auburn University head football coach Tommy Tuberville, who had the backing of President Trump. Tuberville will now face off against Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) in November, who is considered to have one of the most vulnerable Democratic Senate seats in the country.