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Endgame's Artemis desktop. (Screenshot: Endgame)

With Russia, China, Iran and North Korea on the loose, experienced and knowing cyber-security hands are among the world's most sought-after workers. The trouble is that there are not nearly enough of them — estimates are that the U.S. alone could use 200,000 more cyber experts to protect the country's private and public computers. And half or fewer of those applying are not qualified, according to a survey by ISACA, an industry association.

Meet Artemis, an intelligent chatbot launched this year by Endgame, a Virginia-based cyber security firm that has worked most closely with the U.S. intelligence agencies.

Why it matters: Hyrum Anderson, Endgame's lead data scientist, says Artemis (screenshot above) is a shortcut to closing the gap between inexperienced "Tier 1" computer analysts and top-flight but comparatively few "Tier 3" professionals, who know the field.

  • The volume of potentially malicious alerts is "staggering, so a real threat can be lost in the noise," Anderson tells Axios.
  • But by typing questions using natural English into Artemis, a relatively new cyber security analyst can conduct a sophisticated investigation of a vast computer system. "Our customers are trying to protect their systems with limited resources," he said.

Be smart: The yawning shortage of professionals, propelled by a wildly active hacking community — such as BadRabbit, the most recent ransomware attack — is global. There will be 3.5 million unfilled cyber-security jobs by 2021, forecasts CyberSecurity Ventures, an industry newsletter. The labor shortage includes the West and on into India, Japan and China.

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Unpacking Joe Biden's decision to tap John Kerry as his climate envoy

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President-elect Joe Biden is naming former Secretary of State John Kerry as a special presidential envoy for climate change.

Why it matters: The transition team's announcement sought to show that it will be an influential role, noting that Kerry — a former Massachusetts senator and the Democrats' 2004 presidential nominee — will be on the National Security Council.

Dave Lawler, author of World
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Oxford and AstraZeneca's vaccine won't just go to rich countries

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While the 95% efficacy rates for the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines are great news for the U.S. and Europe, Monday's announcement from Oxford and AstraZeneca may be far more significant for the rest of the world.

Why it matters: Oxford and AstraZeneca plan to distribute their vaccine at cost (around $3-4 per dose), and have already committed to providing over 1 billion doses to the developing world. The price tags are higher for the Pfizer ($20) and Moderna ($32-37) vaccines.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Vaccines: Key information about the effective COVID-19 vaccines — Oxford University's 90%-effective vaccine.
  2. Health: U.S. coronavirus hospitalizations keep breaking recordsWhy we're numb to 250,000 coronavirus deaths — Americans line up for testing ahead of Thanksgiving.
  3. Travel: Air travel's COVID-created future — Over 1 million U.S. travelers flew on Friday, despite calls to avoid holiday travel.
  4. World: England to impose stricter regional systemU.S. coronavirus hotspots far outpacing Europe's — Portugal to ban domestic travel for national holidays.
  5. Economy: The biggest pandemic labor market drags.
  6. Sports: Coronavirus precautions leave college basketball schedule in flux.