Endgame's Artemis desktop. (Screenshot: Endgame)

With Russia, China, Iran and North Korea on the loose, experienced and knowing cyber-security hands are among the world's most sought-after workers. The trouble is that there are not nearly enough of them — estimates are that the U.S. alone could use 200,000 more cyber experts to protect the country's private and public computers. And half or fewer of those applying are not qualified, according to a survey by ISACA, an industry association.

Meet Artemis, an intelligent chatbot launched this year by Endgame, a Virginia-based cyber security firm that has worked most closely with the U.S. intelligence agencies.

Why it matters: Hyrum Anderson, Endgame's lead data scientist, says Artemis (screenshot above) is a shortcut to closing the gap between inexperienced "Tier 1" computer analysts and top-flight but comparatively few "Tier 3" professionals, who know the field.

  • The volume of potentially malicious alerts is "staggering, so a real threat can be lost in the noise," Anderson tells Axios.
  • But by typing questions using natural English into Artemis, a relatively new cyber security analyst can conduct a sophisticated investigation of a vast computer system. "Our customers are trying to protect their systems with limited resources," he said.

Be smart: The yawning shortage of professionals, propelled by a wildly active hacking community — such as BadRabbit, the most recent ransomware attack — is global. There will be 3.5 million unfilled cyber-security jobs by 2021, forecasts CyberSecurity Ventures, an industry newsletter. The labor shortage includes the West and on into India, Japan and China.

Go deeper

Biden: The next president should decide on Ginsburg’s replacement

Joe Biden. Photo: Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Joe Biden is calling for the winner of November's presidential election to select Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement on the Supreme Court.

What he's saying: "[L]et me be clear: The voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider," Biden said. "This was the position the Republican Senate took in 2016 when there were almost 10 months to go before the election. That's the position the United States Senate must take today, and the election's only 46 days off.

Trump, McConnell to move fast to replace Ginsburg

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump will move within days to nominate his third Supreme Court justice in just three-plus short years — and shape the court for literally decades to come, top Republican sources tell Axios.

Driving the news: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Republicans are ready to move to confirm Trump's nominee before Election Day, just 46 days away, setting up one of the most consequential periods of our lifetimes, the sources say.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 30,393,591 — Total deaths: 950,344— Total recoveries: 20,679,272Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 6,722,699 — Total deaths: 198,484 — Total recoveries: 2,556,465 — Total tests: 92,163,649Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.