An elections chief inspector at a polling location in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on April 7. Photo: Derek R. Henkle/AFP via Getty Images

Tom Tiffany, a Republican state senator backed by President Trump, won a special congressional election on Tuesday to replace former Rep. Sean Duffy (R) in a rural Wisconsin district, per AP.

The big picture: Wisconsin is a key battleground that Trump "won by less than a point, but carried the district by 20 points, in 2016," AP notes. Democrats told the New York Times the fact Tiffany's margin was about six percentage points less than that shows "Trump’s base is cracking." But AP reports Tiffany said, "Any time you lose by 14 points, I don’t think that’s a moral victory. This is a decisive victory."

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Updated Aug 5, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Primary races to watch in Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Washington

Photo: Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

Primary elections on Tuesday in fives states see crowded fields of both Republicans and Democrats hoping to make the ballot in 2020.

What to watch: Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) is "fighting for her political life" in a tight primary race against Detroit City Council President Brenda Jones, who Tlaib beat by 900 votes in 2018, The New York Times writes. Senate Republicans are also watching the primary race in Kansas to see who could replace retiring Republican Sen. Pat Roberts.

Scoop: Facebook cracks down on political content disguised as local news

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Facebook is rolling out a new policy that will prevent U.S. news publishers with "direct, meaningful ties" to political groups from claiming the news exemption within its political ads authorization process, executives tell Axios.

Why it matters: Since the 2016 election, reporters and researchers have uncovered over 1,200 instances in which political groups use websites disguised as local news outlets to push their point of view to Americans.

6 mins ago - Technology

Nationalism and authoritarianism threaten the internet's universality

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Governments around the world, prompted by nationalism, authoritarianism and other forces, are threatening the notion of a single, universal computer network — long the defining characteristic of the internet.

The big picture: Most countries want the internet and the economic and cultural benefits that come with it. Increasingly, though, they want to add their own rules — the internet with an asterisk, if you will. The question is just how many local rules you can make before the network's universality disappears.