Dec 9, 2019

Wisconsin National Guard commander steps down after sexual assault review

Maj. Gen. Donald Dunbar. Photo: U.S. Army National Guard/Staff Sgt. Michelle Gonzalez

Commander of the Wisconsin National Guard Maj. Gen. Donald Dunbar agreed to resign Monday in light of a new federal sexual assault review that showed significant missteps by the state's Guard, AP reports.

Catch up quick: The National Guard Bureau in Washington reports that the Wisconsin Guard conducted internal investigations in a manner against federal law, Department of Defense and bureau policy. Grievances included mismanaging case records and lacking adequate sexual assault response policies.

  • Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers called on Dunbar to resign Monday following the report's release. Dunbar was the nation's longest-serving state Guard commander.
  • Dunbar is set to step down on Dec. 31. Evers has appointed Brig. Gen. Gary Ebben as interim commander.

What to watch: Evers ordered the state Guard to enact all of the federal report's recommendations by September.

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Harvey Weinstein indicted on sex crimes in Los Angeles

Harvey Weinstein leaving a New York City court, Jan. 6. Photo: Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Harvey Weinstein was indicted Monday on sex crimes charges by prosecutors in Los Angeles, per AP.

The state of play: The new indictment came just hours after the start of Weinstein's separate New York trial on similar charges.

Go deeperArrowJan 6, 2020

Global #MeToo movement has resulted in 7 convictions, 4 charges of influential figures

Bill Cosby, Harvein Weinstein, and Larry Nassar. Photos: Gilbert Carrasquillo/Getty Images, Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images, and Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Hundreds of powerful people — predominately men — have been accused of sexual offenses since the #MeToo movement went viral in 2017. After film producer Harvey Weinstein's conviction, four of them face charges, while seven have been convicted.

Why it matters: The #MeToo movement focused global attention on previously unchecked sexual misconduct, leading at least 201 powerful men to lose jobs or major positions. But the movement, dubbed a global reckoning, has had few legal consequences for the accused. Here are some of the most notable cases.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Mar 11, 2020 - Economy & Business

U.S. law enforcement on guard for potential Iranian retaliation after Soleimani's killing

NYPD officers at Times Square on Jan. 3kp. Photo: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

Security is tightening in New York, Washington, D.C. and San Francisco in the aftermath of the U.S. killing Qasem Soleimani, one of Iran's most powerful figures.

The big picture: Iran largely stopped targeting the West after the Iran deal, but hacking re-emerged against the U.S. as tensions escalated, with activity that appears to be more for information gathering purposes than to cause harm. This could be the regime's tool of choice for retaliating against the U.S., according to multiple reports.

Go deeperArrowJan 4, 2020